Queen of bees dies at 95

September 17, 2007

Renowned bee expert Eva Crane has died in England at age 95, the International Bee Research Association she founded announced.

Crane, who gave up a career in nuclear physics to spread knowledge about bees as a historian, author and archivist, died Sept. 6 in Slough, England, The New York Times reported Sunday.

The scientist traveled the world for 50 years, using modern and primitive means of transport, to find ways bees have been used by humans, the Times said.

Among her discoveries: Babylonians preserved corpses with honey, and the Viet Cong used bees as weapons. She also delighted in uncovering remote pockets where ancient beekeeping methods were still in use.

Crane was born Ethel Eva Widdowson in London June 12, 1912.

No cause of death was reported.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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gmurphy
not rated yet Jun 10, 2009
RIP bee lady

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