Samsung Speeds Up World's Fastest Graphics Memory

February 23, 2007

Samsung Electronics announced today that it has increased the data transfer speed of the world’s fastest graphics memory -- GDDR4 (series four of graphics double-data-rate memory) -- by two-thirds. Graphics memory processes video images in desktop PCs, notebooks and workstations to move huge volumes of video simultaneously.

“Our new GDDR4 memory will add even more zip in video applications, making gaming, computer-aided design and video editing a lot faster than ever before,” said Mueez Deen, marketing director, graphics memory, Samsung Semiconductor, Inc. “This will enable ultra-smooth movements in animation, making games incredibly realistic, resulting in a truly immersive experience,” he added.

Using 80-nanometer production technology, the 4Gb/s (2.0GHz) is 66 percent faster than today’s fastest commercially available memory -- a 2.4Gb/s GDDR4. The new 4Gb/s graphics memory, offered in a 512Mb density, has a 32-bit data bus configuration. GDDR4 uses JEDEC-approved standards for signal noise reduction to help attain the highest possible speed.

Manufacturers of graphics processing units (GPUs) and video cards have expressed a high degree of interest in the new memory, which is ready for customer sampling this month.

Analysts expect GDDR4 to significantly boost demand for the high-performance memory market segment over the next 12-18 months.

Source: Samsung Electronics

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