NIH awards $11.5M for science education

January 6, 2007

Eleven projects exploring different aspects of science will share nearly $11.5 million from the U.S. National Institutions of Health.

Science Education Partnership Awards projects are designed to help educate the public about health issues, promote science literacy and encourage consideration of careers in the health sciences, the NIH said in a news release.

"These programs reach out to students and their families, and target some of the most important issues in medicine today such as ethics, evidence-based medicine, and bioinformatics," said Barbara M. Alving, acting director of the National Center for Research Resources, the NIH division that oversees the program.

Some of the projects include blood research, genome science, a summer science institute and a multifaceted program on cardiovascular disease risk factors, the NIH said.

SEPA programs target students in rural and underserved communities by funding classroom activities from kindergarten through 12th grade, as well as science centers and museum exhibits. The awards support professional development for science teachers, materials and exhibits, and Web sites for students, teachers and the public.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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