China launches second weather satellite

December 8, 2006

China launched its second geostationary satellite, which officials said will provide better weather forecasting for Beijing.

The Fengyun-2D satellite was launched Friday from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in China's Sichuan province, Xinhua said. Among other things, it will monitor weather changes at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing.

The satellite should be in position within a few days, center officials said. It will form a twin observation system with Fengyun-2C, China's first geostationary orbit weather satellite, which was launched in 2004.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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