Scientists urge use of video games

October 17, 2006

U.S. scientists are urging the use of video games to strengthen educational and workforce training.

The recommendations calling on government, educators and business to develop comprehensive strategies to use video games for educational purposes were issued Tuesday by the Federation of American Scientists and the Entertainment Software Association.

The organizations say they want the federal government, industry and the education community to develop a comprehensive strategy to take advantage of video games to help students and workers attain globally competitive skills in demand by employers.

"Many recent reports warning about declining U.S. competitiveness point to an urgent need to improve workforce skills and our system of education," said Henry Kelly, president of the Washington-based, federation.

"Video games are engaging and can teach higher order skills, and they are especially attractive to today's young digital natives who have grown up with digital technology."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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