In Brief: SK Telecom launches HSDPA wireless network

May 30, 2006

The world's first HSDPA wireless network has been launched in South Korea.

Nortel announced over the weekend that SK Telecom's handset-based "3G-plus" network provides wireless broadband on both handsets and laptop data cards using technology from the joint venture LG-Nortel.

The service accommodates high-definition video, streaming MP3, multi-user gaming and other broadband services on cell phones and laptops.

High Speed Downlink Packet Access speeds up the download speeds of standard 3G technologies.

The network has been deployed in 25 cities and will be expanded to another 59 communities by the end of the year.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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