Conservatives band against Net neutrality

May 8, 2006

A group of non-profits launched the Internet Freedom Coalition to oppose efforts to regulate the Internet.

A total of 24 self-described conservative "free-market, limited government, and faith-based grassroots organization, individuals, and policy organizations who have come together on the shared belief that the Internet should not be taxed, regulated, or subject to United Nations control."

"The big government, pro-regulation crowd wants the government to regulate the Internet. Speaking on behalf of our collective membership of over 3 million citizens, we oppose network neutrality and any other form of regulation or taxation of the Internet. Make no mistake: network neutrality is the first giant leap toward government regulation of the Internet," said Jason Wright, president of the Institute for Liberty and co-director of the IFC.

"IFC will primarily use the Internet itself to mobilize opposition to net neutrality regulation," said Michelle Korsmo, executive director of Americans for Prosperity and co-director of the IFC. "We will utilize a massive email campaign, Internet banner ads and calls to action, and web marketing to mobilize opposition to regulation and taxation of the Internet."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: European data sharing pact with US ruled invalid (Update)

Related Stories

Trade in invasive plants is blossoming

October 3, 2015

Every day, hundreds of different plant species—many of them listed as invasive—are traded online worldwide on auction platforms. This exacerbates the problem of uncontrollable biological invasions.

Modi touts social media, tech development in Facebook visit

September 27, 2015

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi touted the power of social media and his own goals for developing India's tech economy on Sunday, speaking to a global audience from a "town hall" meeting at the headquarters of the world's ...

Recommended for you

On soft ground? Tread lightly to stay fast

October 8, 2015

These findings, reported today, Friday 9th October, in the journal Bioinspiration & Biomechanics, offer a new insight into how animals respond to different terrain, and how robots can learn from them.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.