Monarch butterfly population moves closer to extinction

The number of western monarch butterflies wintering along the California coast has plummeted precipitously to a record low, putting the orange-and-black insects closer to extinction, researchers announced Tuesday.

How British people weathered exceptionally cold winters

As global temperatures rise, snowy winters could become a thing of the past in much of the UK, according to a recent Met Office analysis. Aside from depriving schoolchildren of the sheer fun of a snow day, climate change ...

Why snow days are becoming increasingly rare in the UK

Winter frost fairs were common on the frozen River Thames between the 17th and 19th centuries, but they've become unimaginable in our lifetime. Over decades and centuries, natural variability in the climate has plunged the ...

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Winter

Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. Winter officially begins on the winter solstice, being the day of the year which has fewest hours of daylight. Winter ends, and spring begins, on the following equinox. In the Northern Hemisphere, depending on the year, this corresponds to the period between December 20 and 21 and March 20 or 21. Winter is the season between autumn and spring. In many countries in the Southern Hemisphere, including Australia , New Zealand and South Africa, winter begins on 1 June and ends on 31 August.

From a meteorological perspective, winter is the season with the shortest days and the lowest average temperatures. It has colder weather and, especially in the higher latitudes or altitudes, snow and ice. The coldest average temperatures of the season are typically experienced in January in the Northern Hemisphere and in June or July in the Southern Hemisphere.

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