Palau's Rock Islands harbor heat-resistant corals

Ocean warming is driving an increase in the frequency and severity of marine heatwaves, causing untold damage to coral reefs. Tropical corals, which live in symbiosis with tiny single-celled algae, are sensitive to high temperatures, ...

Study examines what microorganisms on Mars would need to survive

No life has yet been found on Mars, but it is exciting to explore the circumstances under which it might be possible. A team led by the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin) with the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology ...

Speeding up DNA computation with liquid droplets

Recent studies have shown that liquid-liquid phase separation—akin to how oil droplets form in water—leads to formation of diverse types of membraneless organelles, such as stress granules and nucleoli, in living cells. ...

Manipulating stress response in cells could help slow down aging

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have found that a stress response in cells, when "switched on" at a post-reproductive age, could be the key to slow down aging and promote longevity.

Discovery of family of hormones may be key to increased crop yields

Crops often face harsh growing environments. Instead of using energy for growth, factors such as disease, extreme temperatures, and salty soils force plants to use it to respond to the resulting stress. This is known as the ...

Researchers identify key player in cellular response to stress

An enzyme called Fic, whose biochemical role was discovered at UT Southwestern more than a dozen years ago, appears to play a crucial part in guiding the cellular response to stress, a new study suggests. The findings, published ...

Ethanol helps plants better tolerate heat stress

A dose of ethanol, better known as common alcohol, can enable plants to withstand heat stress that might otherwise kill them, RIKEN biologists have found. This could offer a low-cost way to make crops more resilient to the ...

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Fight-or-flight response

The "fight-or-flight response", also called the "fight-or-flight-or-freeze response", the "fright, fight or flight response", "hyperarousal" or the "acute stress response", was first described by Walter Cannon in 1929.

His theory states that animals react to threats with a general discharge of the sympathetic nervous system, priming the animal for fighting or fleeing. This response was later recognized as the first stage of a general adaptation syndrome that regulates stress responses among vertebrates and other organisms.

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