Related topics: stress · stress response

Hair indicates whether wild animals were 'stressed'

While hair analysis has become routine in humans—for example for the detection of prolonged drug or medication abuse—it has been little used in animals to date. Scientists led by Alexandre Azevedo and Katarina Jewgenow ...

Link to stress, health of whales might be in giant mouths

Whale researchers in New England believe they've found a new way to measure the amount of stress felt by whales when they experience traumas such as entanglements in fishing gear, and they say the technique could help protect ...

Fish undisturbed by flash photography

Fish experience stress, as do mammals and humans. When under stress, fish release the hormones adrenaline and cortisol. A team of scientists spearheaded by IGB has investigated whether flash photography induces an increase ...

Light pollution makes fish more courageous

Artificial light at night makes guppies more courageous during the day, according to a behavioural study led by researchers from the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Max Planck Institute ...

Finally, a breathtaking photo of beluga whale snot

The above photo captures a beluga calf exhaling thousands of tiny droplets of respiratory vapour, which are valuable to science. The droplets—snot, essentially—help researchers like U of M's Justine Hudson measure stress ...

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Stress hormone

Stress hormones such as cortisol, GH and norepinephrine are released at periods of high stress. The hormone regulating system is known as the endocrine system. Cortisol is believed to affect the metabolic system and norepinephrine is believed to play a role in ADHD as well as depression and hypertension.

Stress hormones rise in the body during any neuroendocrine reaction such as surgery and they remain high to as long as 72 hours after which all these hormones return back to their normal level, the last being cortisol.

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