Related topics: brain

How social dynamics influence the gut microbes of wild lemurs

Humans aren't the only species whose social behaviors can impact their health. New research from The University of Texas at Austin shows that Verreaux's sifaka, a species of wild lemur native to Madagascar, have gut microbes ...

Bat study reveals secrets of the social brain

Whether chatting with friends at a dinner party or managing a high-stakes meeting at work, communicating with others in a group requires a complex set of mental tasks. Our brains must track who is speaking and what is being ...

Physics meets democracy in this modeling study

A study in the journal Physica A leverages concepts from physics to model how campaign strategies influence the opinions of an electorate in a two-party system.

Are women worse than men at salary negotiation?

A team of USC researchers who have long employed virtual humans to understand social behavior set out to find whether women performed differently than men during a salary negotiation.

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Social behavior

In biology, psychology and sociology social behavior is behavior directed towards society, or taking place between, members of the same species. Behavior such as predation which involves members of different species is not social. While many social behaviors are communication (provoke a response, or change in behavior, without acting directly on the receiver) communication between members of different species is not social behavior.

In sociology, "behavior" itself means an animal-like activity devoid of social meaning or social context, in contrast to "social behavior" which has both. In a sociological hierarchy, social behavior is followed by social action, which is directed at other people and is designed to induce a response. Further along this ascending scale are social interaction and social relation. In conclusion, social behavior is a process of communicating.

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