Related topics: brain

Bat study reveals secrets of the social brain

Whether chatting with friends at a dinner party or managing a high-stakes meeting at work, communicating with others in a group requires a complex set of mental tasks. Our brains must track who is speaking and what is being ...

Being social generates larger genomes in snapping shrimp

In an article scheduled to publish in PNAS, on June 7, 2021, a team of researchers led by Columbia University's Dustin R. Rubenstein, a Professor of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, found that within the same ...

New study finds earliest evidence for mammal social behavior

A new study led by paleontologists at the University of Washington and its Burke Museum of Natural History & Culture indicates that the earliest evidence of mammal social behavior goes back to the Age of Dinosaurs.

page 1 from 34

Social behavior

In biology, psychology and sociology social behavior is behavior directed towards society, or taking place between, members of the same species. Behavior such as predation which involves members of different species is not social. While many social behaviors are communication (provoke a response, or change in behavior, without acting directly on the receiver) communication between members of different species is not social behavior.

In sociology, "behavior" itself means an animal-like activity devoid of social meaning or social context, in contrast to "social behavior" which has both. In a sociological hierarchy, social behavior is followed by social action, which is directed at other people and is designed to induce a response. Further along this ascending scale are social interaction and social relation. In conclusion, social behavior is a process of communicating.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA