Related topics: mice · species · brain · neurons · fossil

Naked mole rats migrate above ground with no help from the moon

A full moon conjures an image of a person transforming into a werewolf—a mythical story of moonlight explaining the unexplainable. While werewolves may only exist in the movies, unusual animal and human behaviors noticed ...

Giant extinct ancient rodent had a tiny brain

A team of researchers with Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Universidade Federal do Acre and the Paleontological Institute and Museum has discovered the ancient remains of a giant, extinct, tiny-brained rodent that once ...

Survival of Australian species hinges on working together

When faced with unfavorable environmental conditions, rodent species are likely to form social groups and work cooperatively, according to a new study by researchers at The University of Western Australia.

Studying the visual recognition abilities of rodents

The visual process that allows humans to recognize the gender or emotional state of another person is very sophisticated. Until recently, only primates were believed able to perform such complex operations as object recognition. ...

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Rodent

Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha

Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing.

Forty percent of mammal species are rodents, and they are found in vast numbers on all continents other than Antarctica. Common rodents include mice, rats, squirrels, chipmunks, gophers, porcupines, beavers, hamsters, gerbils, guinea pigs, degus, chinchillas, prairie dogs, and groundhogs. Rodents have sharp incisors that they use to gnaw wood, break into food, and bite predators. Most eat seeds or plants, though some have more varied diets. Some species have historically been pests, eating seeds stored by people and spreading disease.

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