Unique terahertz microscope can be operated remotely

With a wave length of about half a millimeter, terahertz radiation fills the gap between visible light and radio waves. This radiation lends itself very well to the in-depth measurement of the electrical properties of new ...

Sustainable fuel blends could help airlines clean up their act

Sustainable fuel blends used by aircraft may help reduce the impact of aviation on climate warming by producing less contrail cloud, concludes a study published in Communications Earth & Environment. The findings suggest ...

Juno detects Jupiter's highest-energy ions

Jupiter's planetary radiation environment is the most intense in the solar system. NASA's Juno spacecraft has been orbiting the planet closer than any previous mission since 2016, investigating its innermost radiation belts ...

Stoneflies: Youth influences adulthood

In the majority of insects, metamorphosis fosters completely different-looking larval and adult stages. For example, adult butterflies are completely different from their larval counterparts, termed caterpillars. This "decoupling" ...

Liquid water on exomoons of free-floating planets

The moons of planets that have no parent star can possess an atmosphere and retain liquid water. Astrophysicists at LMU have calculated that such systems could harbor sufficient water to make life possible—and sustain it.

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Radiation

In physics, radiation describes any process in which energy emitted by one body travels through a medium or through space, ultimately to be absorbed by another body. Non-physicists often associate the word with ionizing radiation (e.g., as occurring in nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, and radioactive substances), but it can also refer to electromagnetic radiation (i.e., radio waves, infrared light, visible light, ultraviolet light, and X-rays) which can also be ionizing radiation, to acoustic radiation, or to other more obscure processes. What makes it radiation is that the energy radiates (i.e., it travels outward in straight lines in all directions) from the source. This geometry naturally leads to a system of measurements and physical units that are equally applicable to all types of radiation.

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