The promise of deep grooves

A manufacturing technique that could help the semiconductor industry make more powerful computer chips began in the humblest of places—at a lunch table at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

A ski jacket that actively gets rid of sweat

To keep the body warm and dry during winter sports, high-performance clothing is a must. The demands on these textiles are high, as a person sweats up to one liter per hour on his upper body alone when skiing. A new technology, ...

A polymer 'love hormone' sensor for the early detection of autism

Is it possible to detect features of autism at birth? At the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, researchers have developed a sensor could make such detection a reality. The main recognition ...

The power of perovskite

OIST researchers improve perovskite-based technology in the entire energy cycle, from solar cells harnessing power to LED diodes to light the screens of future electronic devices and other lighting applications.

Nano fiber feels forces and hears sounds made by cells

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a miniature device that's sensitive enough to feel the forces generated by swimming bacteria and hear the beating of heart muscle cells.

Smashing metallic cubes toughens them up

Scientists at Rice University are smashing metallic micro-cubes to make them ultrastrong and tough by rearranging their nanostructures upon impact.

'Swiss army knife' molecule

Scientists at ETH Zurich and an ETH spin-off have developed a novel polymer for coating materials, in order to prevent biofilms from forming on their surfaces. Thanks to the technological platform developed, it is now possible ...

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