Nanospheres measure the forces of cell motors

Motor proteins generate the forces for essential mechanical processes in our body. On a scale of nanometers—a millionth of a millimeter—motor proteins, for example, power our muscles or transport material within our cells. ...

Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant

Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial ...

Keeping our cells stable: A closer look at microtubules

Microtubules help to regulate cell structure. A group of Japanese researchers have used cryo-electron microscopy to shed light on how a certain protein keeps microtubules stable and regulates microtubule-based transport within ...

The motor protein dancing in all our cells

Motor proteins drive many of the essential processes in our cells. They move with a dancing motion, as Professor Erik Schäffer and his team have shown in a new study. In order to observe the tiny proteins, which are measured ...

Some motor proteins cooperate better than others

Rice University researchers have engineered cells to characterize how sensitively altering the cooperative functions of motor proteins can regulate the transport of organelles.

A metal switch to control motor proteins

(Phys.org) —Molecular motor proteins inside the body, called kinesins, are a lot like the motor in your car. The molecular motors convert stored chemical energy into specific conformational changes, which lead to various ...

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