Sea sponges need oxygen, as fish and people do

The inconspicuous sea sponges are Earth's oldest multicellular animals and have filtered the oceans for nearly 900 million years, long before the first plants appeared on land. New research appearing in the journal Fishery ...

Urban bacteria are a diverse group

More than half the world's population lives in urban areas. In the United States, more than 8 in 10 people are urbanites. Urban ecosystems often have less diverse animal and plant life compared to natural areas. But that's ...

Rethinking the wild world of species diversity in microbes

University of Maryland biologists developed the first mathematical simulations of bacterial communities that incorporate the complex interactions and rapid evolution among bacteria and reflect the tremendous species diversity ...

How social dynamics influence the gut microbes of wild lemurs

Humans aren't the only species whose social behaviors can impact their health. New research from The University of Texas at Austin shows that Verreaux's sifaka, a species of wild lemur native to Madagascar, have gut microbes ...

How do microbes choose from a 'menu' of food?

Microbial communities often contain several species that coexist even though they share similar metabolic abilities. How they do so is unclear. Researchers have now developed a model to show that if these species have complementary ...

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