Human gut microbes could make processed foods healthier

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis sheds light on how human gut microbes break down processed foods—especially potentially harmful chemical changes often produced during modern food manufacturing ...

Decoding messages in the body's microscopic metropolises

A study aimed at identifying and examining the small messenger proteins used by microbes living on and inside humans has revealed an astounding diversity of more than 4,000 families of molecules – many of which have never ...

Finding (microbial) pillars of the bioenergy community

Stems, leaves, flowers and fruits make up the biggest chunk of potential living space for microbes in the environment, but ecologists still don't know a lot about how the microorganisms that reside there establish and maintain ...

The kombucha culture

In today's health-conscious community, kombucha is all the rave. Its appeal comes from its accessibility and alleged health benefits, which range from introducing probiotics to killing deleterious bacteria in the human body.

Computational tool predicts how gut microbiome changes over time

A new computational modeling method uses snapshots of which types of microbes are found in a person's gut to predict how the microbial community will change over time. The tool, developed by Liat Shenhav, Leah Briscoe and ...

Team proposes stochastic model to explain microbiome composition

All living things—from the simplest animal and plant organisms to the human body—live closely together with an enormous abundance of microbial symbionts, which colonise the insides and outsides of their tissues. The functional ...

page 1 from 23