Slippery when wet: How does lubrication work?

In a recent paper in Science Advances, researchers from the University of Amsterdam present new experimental insight into how lubrication works. They have developed a new method using fluorescent molecules to directly observe ...

Decoding the fundamental mechanisms of human salivary lubrication

An interdisciplinary team of scientists led by the University of Leeds have uncovered the fundamental mechanism by which human saliva lubricates our mouth. Their multi-scale study opens the door to advancing dry mouth therapies ...

Sliding along on water

Machine bearings are usually lubricated with various oils. But today large quantities of these oils still end up in the environment. The Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM has developed a method which will ...

Driving force of volcanic super-hazards uncovered

Massey volcanologists have discovered the driving force behind superheated gas-and-ash clouds from volcanic eruptions, which may help save lives and infrastructure around the globe.

Researchers synthesize renewable oils for use in lubricants

Engine gears, plane thrusters, refrigerator compressors, wind turbines—the list of important industrial machinery, agricultural equipment, transportation vessels, and home applications that depend on lubricants might be ...

Another step closer to tunable liquids

Using electrical fields to modify the properties of liquids in contact with a surface can be used in several applications, such as electrophoresis, where an electric current can separate molecules by size. Researchers at ...

Nanodiamonds are forever

Say goodbye to the slogan "diamonds are forever." For industries that use dry lubricant, the up-and-coming phrase is more likely to be "broken nanodiamonds are forever."

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