Related topics: light · laser · electrons · molecules · atoms

Visualizing microscopic 3D displacements over large areas

A team of researchers from PSL University, Harvard University and China University of Petroleum, has developed a way to visualize microscopic 3D displacements of moving objects or events over large areas. In their paper published ...

Biophotonic probes for bio-detection and imaging

Sensitive detection and imaging in bio-microenvironment is highly desired in biophotonic and biomedical applications. However, conventional photonic materials inevitably show incompatibility and invasiveness to bio-systems. ...

New quantum 'stopwatch' can improve imaging technologies

Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have designed one of the most precise stopwatches yet—not for timing Olympic sprinters and swimmers, but for counting single photons, or the tiny packets of energy that ...

An X-ray vision-like camera to rapidly retrieve 3D images

It's not exactly X-ray vision, but it's close. In research published in the journal Optica, University of California, Irvine researchers describe a new type of camera technology that, when aimed at an object, can rapidly ...

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Laser

A laser is a device that emits light (electromagnetic radiation) through a process called stimulated emission. The term laser is an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. Laser light is usually spatially coherent, which means that the light either is emitted in a narrow, low-divergence beam, or can be converted into one with the help of optical components such as lenses. Typically, lasers are thought of as emitting light with a narrow wavelength spectrum ("monochromatic" light). This is not true of all lasers, however: some emit light with a broad spectrum, while others emit light at multiple distinct wavelengths simultaneously. The coherence of typical laser emission is distinctive. Most other light sources emit incoherent light, which has a phase that varies randomly with time and position.

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