Related topics: light · laser · electrons · molecules · atoms

Researchers demonstrate chemically sensitive LiDAR method

Researchers have developed a new laser-based technique that can simultaneously perform LiDAR and remote chemical measurements. LiDAR, which stands for light detection and ranging, uses a laser to measure distances, or ranges. ...

Quantum light source advances bio-imaging clarity

Texas A&M University researchers accomplished what was once considered impossible—they created a device capable of squeezing the quantum fluctuations of light down to a directed path and used it to enhance contrast imaging.

Physicists develop a perfect light trap

Whether in photosynthesis or in a photovoltaic system: if you want to use light efficiently, you have to absorb it as completely as possible. However, this is difficult if the absorption is to take place in a thin layer of ...

Physicists entangle more than a dozen photons efficiently

Physicists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have managed to entangle more than a dozen photons efficiently and in a defined way. They are thus creating a basis for a new type of quantum computer. Their study ...

page 1 from 40

Laser

A laser is a device that emits light (electromagnetic radiation) through a process called stimulated emission. The term laser is an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. Laser light is usually spatially coherent, which means that the light either is emitted in a narrow, low-divergence beam, or can be converted into one with the help of optical components such as lenses. Typically, lasers are thought of as emitting light with a narrow wavelength spectrum ("monochromatic" light). This is not true of all lasers, however: some emit light with a broad spectrum, while others emit light at multiple distinct wavelengths simultaneously. The coherence of typical laser emission is distinctive. Most other light sources emit incoherent light, which has a phase that varies randomly with time and position.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA