Related topics: carbon dioxide

Platinum-free catalysts could make cheaper hydrogen fuel cells

The high cost of platinum catalysts used in hydrogen fuel cells limits the commercialization of fuel cell electric vehicles. Scientists are studying alternative catalysts to increase cost-effectiveness and maintain efficiency ...

Researchers observe iron in exoplanetary atmosphere

An international team of researchers, led by astronomers from the University of Amsterdam, has directly demonstrated the presence of iron in the atmosphere of an exoplanet for the first time. The researchers discovered emission ...

Tiny technology cleans dirty water

An activated carbon filter—found in many household filtration systems—can purify your drinking water, but it's no match for wastewater that contains military-grade explosives. To clean wastewater from munitions processing ...

Ultra-precision nano-sensor could detect iron disorders

Chronic iron imbalances—having either too little or too much iron in the blood—can result in medical conditions ranging from anaemia and haemochromatosis through to more severe diseases, such as cancer, Parkinson's Disease ...

Tube worm slime displays long-lasting, self-powered glow

When threatened, the marine parchment tube worm secretes a sticky slime that emits a unique long-lasting blue light. New research into how the worm creates and sustains this light suggests that the process is self-powered.

Nanoparticles: Acidic alert

Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have synthesized nanoparticles that can be induced by a change in pH to release a deadly dose of ionized iron within cells. This mechanism could potentially open ...

page 1 from 93

Iron

Iron (pronounced /ˈаɪ.ərn/) is a chemical element with the symbol Fe (Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. Iron is a group 8 and period 4 element. Iron and iron alloys (steels) are by far the most common metals and the most common ferromagnetic materials in everyday use. Fresh iron surfaces are lustrous and silvery-grey in colour, but oxidise in air to form a red or brown coating of ferrous oxide or rust. Pure single crystals of iron are soft (softer than aluminium), and the addition of minute amounts of impurities, such as carbon, significantly strengthens them. Alloying iron with appropriate small amounts (up to a few per cent) of other metals and carbon produces steel, which can be 1,000 times harder than pure iron.

Iron-56 is the heaviest stable isotope produced by the alpha process in stellar nucleosynthesis; heavier elements than iron and nickel require a supernova for their formation. Iron is the most abundant element in the core of red giants, and is the most abundant metal in iron meteorites and in the dense metal cores of planets such as Earth.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA