Iron rain fell on early Earth, new Z machine data supports

Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories' Z machine have helped untangle a long-standing mystery of astrophysics: why iron is found spattered throughout Earth's mantle, the roughly 2,000-mile thick region between Earth's ...

Iron 'fingerprints' point astronomers to supernova suspects

(Phys.org) —An international team of astronomers using data from the Japan-led Suzaku X-ray observatory has developed a powerful technique for analyzing supernova remnants, the expanding clouds of debris left behind when ...

NuSTAR telescope takes first peek into core of supernova

(Phys.org) —Astronomers have peered for the first time into the heart of an exploding star in the final minutes of its existence. The feat by the high-energy X-ray satellite NuSTAR provides details of the physics of the ...

Earth's core reveals an inner weakness

(Phys.org) —The word "core" conjures up an image of something strong. However, new experiments show that the iron found in the Earth's core is relatively weak. This finding is based on x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction ...

Iron in the Earth's core weakens before melting

The iron in the Earth's inner core weakens dramatically before it melts, explaining the unusual properties that exist in the moon-sized solid centre of our planet that have, up until now, been difficult to understand.

Precious Western Australia mineral geologically 'young'

Scientists at Curtin University have chronicled the genesis of a particular type of iron deposit in the state's north, finding that the valuable mineral formed relatively late in Western Australia's evolution.

Scientists solve a 14,000-year-old ocean mystery

At the end of the last Ice Age, as the world began to warm, a swath of the North Pacific Ocean came to life. During a brief pulse of biological productivity 14,000 years ago, this stretch of the sea teemed with phytoplankton, ...

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