Lost in translation: When humor kills the message

Getting a laugh may not help get the road safety message across, with a new QUT study showing humorous driver sleepiness advertisements can get lost in translation.

Is there such a thing as a national sense of humour?

We're all aware that there are stereotypes. The British are sharply sarcastic, the Americans are great at physical comedy, and the Japanese love puns. But is humour actually driven by culture to any meaningful extent? Couldn't ...

Implications of humor in social media job adverts

Can humour on social media help managers find the most appropriate candidates for the job vacancies they hope to fill? Writing in the International Journal of Internet Marketing and Advertising, researchers from Finland, ...

Humour in the 13th century characterized by ridicule

We tend to think of the Middle Ages as grotesque and dreary. However, 13th century elites made use of laughter quite deliberately – and it resounded most loudly when it was at someone else's expense.

Clarke clarifies pattern recognition theory of humour

Recent commentary has suggested that the extent to which anomaly theories have become ingrained in the minds of academics and popular commentators alike has led to certain common assumptions and misconceptions about Clarke's ...

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