Organic porous structures on 2-D defect networks

NUS scientists have developed a method for self-assembly of hexagonal organic porous structures on molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) film to create ordered nanostructures.

Image: BioRock and roll

This fluorescent work of art captures the beauty of biofilms, or the growth of microbes on rocks. In this microscopic image, Sphingomonas desiccabilis is growing on basalt.

Illuminating nanoparticle growth with X-rays

Hydrogen fuel cells are a promising technology for producing clean and renewable energy, but the cost and activity of their cathode materials is a major challenge for commercialization. Many fuel cells require expensive platinum-based ...

Nobarrier to applications for a remarkable 2-D material

Mass production of large, uniform sheets of single-layer molybdenum disulfide, MoS2, is difficult, which limits its commercial application. A*STAR researchers have modified an existing manufacturing technique to enable the ...

Scientists observe nanowires as they grow

At DESY's X-ray source PETRA III, scientists have followed the growth of tiny wires of gallium arsenide live. Their observations reveal exact details of the growth process responsible for the evolving shape and crystal structure ...

Team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

When Israeli scientist Daniel Shechtman first saw a quasicrystal through his microscope in 1982, he reportedly thought to himself, "Eyn chaya kazo"—Hebrew for, "There can be no such creature."

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