Related topics: cancer · cancer cells · nanoparticles · nanometers · gold

Scientists create new nanocomposite from gold and titanium oxide

Oxides of different metals often serve as photocatalysts in various systems such as air purification, reactions of water decomposition and even in the production of self-cleaning surfaces for glass and mirrors. The physical-chemical ...

A new 'gold standard' for safer ceramic coatings

Making your own ceramics can be a way to express your creativity, but some techniques and materials used in the process could spell bad news for your health and the environment. If not prepared properly, some glazed ceramics ...

Gold nanoparticles uncover amyloid fibrils

EPFL scientists have developed powerful tools to unmask the diversity of amyloid fibrils, which are associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. The scientists made the breakthrough by developing ...

New tool monitors real time mutations in flu

A Rutgers-led team has developed a tool to monitor influenza A virus mutations in real time, which could help virologists learn how to stop viruses from replicating.

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Colloidal gold

Colloidal gold, also known as "nanogold", is a suspension (or colloid) of sub-micrometre-sized particles of gold in a fluid — usually water. The liquid is usually either an intense red colour (for particles less than 100 nm), or a dirty yellowish colour (for larger particles). The nanoparticles themselves can come in a variety of shapes. Spheres, rods, cubes, and caps are some of the more frequently observed ones.

Known since ancient times, the synthesis of colloidal gold was originally used as a method of staining glass. Modern scientific evaluation of colloidal gold did not begin until Michael Faraday's work of the 1850s. Due to the unique optical, electronic, and molecular-recognition properties of gold nanoparticles, they are the subject of substantial research, with applications in a wide variety of areas, including electronics, nanotechnology, and the synthesis of novel[peacock term] materials with unique properties.[peacock term]

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