Related topics: cancer · cancer cells · nanoparticles · nanometers · gold

Applying precious metal catalysts economically

Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Fritz Haber Institute Berlin have developed a new method of to conserve rare and expensive catalysts and use them sparingly. They enclosed a precious metal salt in tiny micelles, ...

Chemists manipulate the quantum states of gold nanoclusters

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Department of Chemistry have found a way to control the lifetime of the quantum states of gold nanoclusters by three orders of magnitude, which could lead to improvements in solar ...

Researchers report new light-activated micro pump

Even the smallest mechanical pumps have limitations, from the complex microfabrication techniques required to make them to the fact that there are limits on how small they can be. Researchers have announced a potential solution—a ...

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Colloidal gold

Colloidal gold, also known as "nanogold", is a suspension (or colloid) of sub-micrometre-sized particles of gold in a fluid — usually water. The liquid is usually either an intense red colour (for particles less than 100 nm), or a dirty yellowish colour (for larger particles). The nanoparticles themselves can come in a variety of shapes. Spheres, rods, cubes, and caps are some of the more frequently observed ones.

Known since ancient times, the synthesis of colloidal gold was originally used as a method of staining glass. Modern scientific evaluation of colloidal gold did not begin until Michael Faraday's work of the 1850s. Due to the unique optical, electronic, and molecular-recognition properties of gold nanoparticles, they are the subject of substantial research, with applications in a wide variety of areas, including electronics, nanotechnology, and the synthesis of novel[peacock term] materials with unique properties.[peacock term]

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