Related topics: nanoparticles · nanoscale · nanotechnology · molecules · light

Water splitting observed on the nanometer scale

It is a well-known school experiment: Applying a voltage between two electrodes inserted in water produces molecular hydrogen and oxygen. Researchers seek to make water splitting as energy-efficient as possible to advance ...

Pinpointing biomolecules with nanometer accuracy

It would be impossible to understand life without having a firm grasp on the microscopic interactions between molecules that occur in and around cells. Microscopes are and have been an invaluable tool for researchers in this ...

Making metal with the lightness of air

Gold, silver and copper are heavy metals, but LLNL scientists can now make them nearly as light as air—in a form so tiny it can ride on a mosquito's back.

Breakthrough in the search for graphene-based electronics

For 15 years, scientists have tried to exploit the "miracle material" graphene to produce nanoscale electronics. On paper, graphene should be great for just that: it is ultra-thin—only one atom thick and therefore two-dimensional, ...

Carbon nanotubes mime biology

Cellular membranes serve as an ideal example of a system that is multifunctional, tunable, precise and efficient.

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Nanometre

A nanometre (American spelling: nanometer; symbol nm) (Greek: νάνος, nanos, "dwarf"; μέτρον, metrοn, "unit of measurement") is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one billionth of a metre (i.e., 10-9 m or one millionth of a millimetre).

It is one of the more often used units for very small lengths, and equals ten Ångström, an internationally recognized non-SI unit of length. It is often associated with the field of nanotechnology and the wavelength of light. Formerly, millimicron (symbol ) was used for the nanometre. The symbol µµ has also been used .

It is also the most common unit used to describe the manufacturing technology used in the semiconductor industry. It is the most common unit to describe the wavelength of light, with visible light falling in the region of 400–700 nm. The data in compact discs is stored as indentations (known as pits) that are approximately 100 nm deep by 500 nm wide. Reading an optical disk requires a laser with a wavelength 4 times the pit depth -- a CD requires a 780 nm wavelength (near infrared) laser, while the shallower pits of a DVD requires a shorter 650 nm wavelength (red) laser, and the even shallower pits of a Blu-ray Disc require a shorter 405 nm wavelength (blue) laser.

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