Did comet impacts jump-start life on Earth?

Comets screaming through the atmosphere of early Earth at tens of thousands of miles per hour likely contained measurable amounts of protein-forming amino acids. Upon impact, these amino acids self-assembled into significantly ...

Study tracks inner workings of the brain with new biosensor

An international team of scientists have taken an important step towards gaining a better understanding of the brain's inner workings, including the molecular processes that could play a role in neurological disorders.  

Australian vine can boost soybean yield, study says

Growing in its native Australia, the unobtrusive perennial vine Glycine tomentella could easily be overlooked. But the distant relative of soybean contains genetic resources that can substantially increase soybean yield, ...

Stop and go in the potassium channel

Cells need openings in the cell membrane in order to make exchanges with their environment. These openings are closable portals in which the signals are transported in the form of ions. Private lecturer Dr. Indra Schröder ...

Comet contains glycine, key part of recipe for life

An important amino acid called glycine has been detected in a comet for the first time, supporting the theory that these cosmic bodies delivered the ingredients for life on Earth, researchers said Friday.

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