Related topics: climate change · climate models · climate · clouds

Scientists map 'deepest' parts of Southern Ocean

A team of researchers led by British Antarctic Survey has for the first time mapped the deepest part of the South Sandwich Trench in the Southern Ocean. This part of the ocean is more than seven kilometres deep in places ...

UN calls for urgent rethink as resource use skyrockets

The International Resource Panel of the United Nations Environment Programme, with CML researcher Ester van der Voet as member, has prepared a report called Global Resources Outlook 2019: Natural Resources for the Future ...

Finding the right 'dose' for solar geoengineering

One of the key misconceptions about solar geoengineering—putting aerosols into the atmosphere to reflect sunlight and reduce global warming—is that it could be used as a fix-all to reverse global warming trends and bring ...

Is climate change already making hurricanes stronger?

Scientists generally agree that, by the year 2100, climate change will most likely make hurricanes stronger. But what about the hurricanes of this year and next—is climate change already worsening those? The science is ...

The mechanism for Arctic cold air outbreaks into Eurasia

It is a reliable occurrence now: every time we have a cold event here in the United States, two public conversations begin, both of which deploy the term "polar vortex." Those who are suspicious of the reality of climate ...

High CO2 levels can destabilize marine layer clouds

At high enough atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, Earth could reach a tipping point where marine stratus clouds become unstable and disappear, triggering a spike in global warming, according to a new modeling ...

Existing climate models useful in forecasting, model testing

A team of scientists has figured out a shortcut way to produce skillful seasonal climate forecasts with a fraction of the computing power normally needed. The technique involves searching within existing global climate models ...

Slowing climate change could reverse drying in the subtropics

As the planet warms, subtropical regions of the Southern Hemisphere, including parts of southern Australia and southern Africa, are drying. These trends include major drought events such as Cape Town's "Day Zero" in 2018.

page 1 from 23