Undersea gases could superheat the planet

The world's oceans could harbor an unpleasant surprise for global warming, based on new research that shows how naturally occurring carbon gases trapped in reservoirs atop the seafloor escaped to superheat the planet in prehistory.

By 2080, Washington D.C. climate may feel like Deep South

In a single generation, climate patterns will shift hundreds of kilometres in the United States, according to a study tracking the northward drift of hotter climes brought on by climate change and global warming.

Sand from glacial melt could be Greenland's economic salvation

As climate change melts Greenland's glaciers and deposits more river sediment on its shores, an international group of researchers has identified one unforeseen economic opportunity for the Arctic nation: exporting excess ...

Green buildings must do more to fix our climate emergency

After more than three decades of talk about the potential of building green, we've still failed to change the way we design and construct buildings so that the built environment stops being a dominant contributor to runaway ...

Climate change in the balance

The United States and China together account for nearly 45 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels, so their decisions have a major impact on the pace and magnitude of climate change.

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