New hybrid electrolyte for high performance Li-ion batteries

Li-ion batteries (LIBs) are widely used batteries that support modern ITC society, including smartphones and EVs. LIBs are repeatedly charged and discharged by Li-ions passing back and forth between the positive and negative ...

Glowing tags reveal split-second activity of pathogenic circuitry

Synthetic biologists at Rice University have developed the first technology for observing the real-time activity of some of most common signal-processing circuits in bacteria, including deadly pathogens that use the circuits ...

Novel gel proves itself to be a highly tunable color filter

Color these scientists happy. An exotic gel they studied at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has an unexpected property: The material's temperature determines which color of light can pass through ...

New gel protects eggs—and maybe someday, heads—from damage

Humpty Dumpty, the famous egg of nursery rhyme fame, fell off a wall and couldn't be put back together again. But if he'd worn a protective jacket made of gelatin and cornstarch, he could have stayed intact. Researchers in ...

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Gel

A gel (from the lat. gelu—freezing, cold, ice or gelatus—frozen, immobile) is a solid, jelly-like material that can have properties ranging from soft and weak to hard and tough. Gels are defined as a substantially dilute cross-linked system, which exhibits no flow when in the steady-state. By weight, gels are mostly liquid, yet they behave like solids due to a three-dimensional cross-linked network within the liquid. It is the crosslinks within the fluid that give a gel its structure (hardness) and contribute to stickiness (tack). In this way gels are a dispersion of molecules of a liquid within a solid in which the solid is the continuous phase and the liquid is the discontinuous phase.

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