Novel enzyme discovered in intestinal bacteria

The human intestinal system contains a complex community of microorganisms, the intestinal microbiome, which metabolizes food components that have not readily been digested. However, there are also microbial degradation processes ...

A closer look at the communication packages of cells

Cells communicate by sending little fat balls to one another. Wouter Roos, professor of Molecular Biophysics at the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, together with colleagues from Amsterdam and Utrecht, is the first to describe ...

Scientists shine light on protein linked to fat storage

In new research that may have implications for strategies fighting obesity and diabetes, UNSW scientists have uncovered the structure of a protein believed to regulate the formation of fat in cells, as well as the formation ...

Low copper levels linked to fatter fat cells

In studies of mouse cells, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that low levels of cellular copper appear to make fat cells fatter by altering how cells process their main metabolic fuels, such as fat and sugar.

The cells that control the formation of fat

Fat cells, or adipocytes, are at the center of nutritional and metabolic balance. Adipogenesis—the formation of mature fat cells from their precursor cells—has been linked to obesity and related health problems such as ...

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Adipose tissue

In histology, adipose tissue or body fat or just fat is loose connective tissue composed of adipocytes. Adipose tissue is derived from lipoblasts. Its main role is to store energy in the form of fat, although it also cushions and insulates the body. Obesity or being overweight in humans and most animals does not depend on body weight but on the amount of body fat—specifically, adipose tissue. Two types of adipose tissue exist: white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). Adipose tissue also serves as an important endocrine organ by producing hormones such as leptin, resistin and the cytokine TNFα. The formation of adipose tissue appears to be controlled by the adipose gene. Adipose tissue was first identified by the Swiss naturalist Conrad Gessner in 1551.\

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