Team achieves breakthrough using CRISPR-Cas9 to target fat cells

Fat—it is tvital for life but too much can lead to a host of health problems. Studying how fat—or adipose—tissue functions in the body is critical for understanding obesity and other issues, yet structural differences ...

A brain switch that helps worms keep their cool

How our bodies sense and respond to environmental changes are fundamental biological questions. In particular, understanding how organisms sense and cope with warming temperatures is key for the survival of species and it ...

Researchers find fat burning molecule in mice

Linked to serious health problems including cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, obesity affects more than a third of adults in the United States. Presently, there are few safe and effective nonsurgical therapeutic ...

Researchers create new form of cultivated meat

McMaster researchers have developed a new form of cultivated meat using a method that promises more natural flavor and texture than other alternatives to traditional meat from animals.

Fats fighting back against bacteria

Droplets of fat inside our cells are helping the body's own defence system fight back against infection, University of Queensland researchers have discovered.

Sex cells have a sweet tooth, and they pass it on to the brain

Our job seems easy when compared with that of our cells. While they are hard at work, breaking some molecules and building others, we mainly have to do one thing—feed them. But what exactly should we feed them? This is ...

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Adipose tissue

In histology, adipose tissue or body fat or just fat is loose connective tissue composed of adipocytes. Adipose tissue is derived from lipoblasts. Its main role is to store energy in the form of fat, although it also cushions and insulates the body. Obesity or being overweight in humans and most animals does not depend on body weight but on the amount of body fat—specifically, adipose tissue. Two types of adipose tissue exist: white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). Adipose tissue also serves as an important endocrine organ by producing hormones such as leptin, resistin and the cytokine TNFα. The formation of adipose tissue appears to be controlled by the adipose gene. Adipose tissue was first identified by the Swiss naturalist Conrad Gessner in 1551.\

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