Carbon nanotube tape stays sticky in extreme temperatures

In very hot or cold environments, conventional tape can lose its stickiness and leave behind an annoying residue. But while most people can avoid keeping taped items in a hot car or freezer, those living in extreme environments ...

New quantum material could warn of neurological disease

What if the brain could detect its own disease? Researchers have been trying to create a material that "thinks" like the brain does, which would be more sensitive to early signs of neurological diseases such as Parkinson's.

Programming in crayon

Electronic devices can spark kids' creativity, says Stéphane Magnenat from the Game Technology Center. But doing so requires apps that bridge the real and virtual worlds.

Hall effect becomes viscous in graphene

Researchers at The University of Manchester in the UK have discovered that the Hall effect—a phenomenon well known for more than a century—is no longer as universal as it was thought to be.

New instrument unravels landscape longevity

How many years can a mountain exist? Bob Dylan's rhetorical question has just received yet another scientifically based answer. Researchers from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) and Denmark's Technical University (DTU) ...

Making a transparent flexible material of silk and nanotubes

The silk fibers produced by Bombyx mori, the domestic silkworm, has been prized for millennia as a strong yet lightweight and luxurious material. Although synthetic polymers like nylon and polyester are less costly, they ...

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