What stops flows in glassy materials?

Glasses have a liquid-like disordered structure but solid-like mechanical properties. This leads to one of the central mysteries of glasses: Why don't they flow like liquids? This question is so important that it was selected ...

Driving water splitting to create chemical fuels

The sun is an abundant source of renewable energy, which can be captured and converted into usable electricity. However, because the sun doesn't always shine, the supply of energy is not continuous. We need a way to store ...

Ironing out technetium contamination

Millions of medical imaging procedures each year rely on radioactive technetium. One of its radioisotopes decays quickly and is useful as a tracer material in nuclear medicine. But another, technetium-99, is very long-lived, ...

Light-emitting silicon for photonic computing

If computers transmitted data using photons instead of electrons, they would perform better and use less power. European researchers are now studying a new light-emitting alloy of silicon and germanium to obtain photonic ...

page 1 from 17

Crystal structure

In mineralogy and crystallography, a crystal structure is a unique arrangement of atoms in a crystal. A crystal structure is composed of a motif, a set of atoms arranged in a particular way, and a lattice. Motifs are located upon the points of a lattice, which is an array of points repeating periodically in three dimensions. The points can be thought of as forming identical tiny boxes, called unit cells, that fill the space of the lattice. The lengths of the edges of a unit cell and the angles between them are called the lattice parameters. The symmetry properties of the crystal are embodied in its space group. A crystal's structure and symmetry play a role in determining many of its properties, such as cleavage, electronic band structure, and optical properties.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA