New model could improve matches between students and schools

For the majority of students in the U.S., residential addresses determine which public elementary, middle, or high school they attend. But with an influx of charter schools and state-funded voucher programs for private schools, ...

Restaurant menu design could impact carbon footprint of dining

A study employing hypothetical restaurant menus suggests that climate-friendly default options and labels indicating the carbon footprint of each dish may influence diners' dish selections and the resulting environmental ...

How food choices can help the planet

A new book published by researchers at the University of Sydney and Curtin University explores how global food production and consumption are impacting the environment and contributing to emissions, offering a positive, sustainable ...

How baboons keep healthy family boundaries

Finding love in a small isolated place can be tough when everyone is a familiar face, or when half the dating pool is already out because they're all close relatives.

Experiment reveals social conventions between baboons

A research team from the CNRS and Aix-Marseille Université has demonstrated that members of a group of baboons can establish shared social conventions—in this case, by all agreeing on how to solve a problem in order to ...

Poor diets imperilling people and the planet: report

Nearly half the world's population suffer from poor nutrition linked to too much or not enough food, a global assessment said Tuesday with wide-ranging impacts on health and the planet.

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Choice

Choice consists of the mental process of judging the merits of multiple options and selecting one of them. While a choice can be made between imagined options ("what would I do if ...?"), often a choice is made between real options, and followed by the corresponding action. For example, a route for a journey is chosen based on the preference of arriving at a given destination as soon as possible. The preferred (and therefore chosen) route is then derived from information about how long each of the possible routes take. This can be done by a route planner. If the preference is more complex, such as involving the scenery of the route, cognition and feeling are more intertwined, and the choice is less easy to delegate to a computer program or assistant.

More complex examples (often decisions that affect what a person thinks or their core beliefs) include choosing a lifestyle, religious affiliation, or political position.

Most people regard having choices as a good thing, though a severely limited or artificially restricted choice can lead to discomfort with choosing and possibly, an unsatisfactory outcome. In contrast, unlimited choice may lead to confusion, regret of the alternatives not taken, and indifference in an unstructured existence; and the illusion that choosing an object or a course leads necessarily to control of that object or course can cause psychological problems.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA