Carbon dioxide controls Earth's temperature

(PhysOrg.com) -- Water vapor and clouds are the major contributors to Earth's greenhouse effect, but a new atmosphere-ocean climate modeling study shows that the planet's temperature ultimately depends on the atmospheric ...

Quantum physicists turn waste heat into power

(PhysOrg.com) -- University of Arizona physicists have discovered a new way of harvesting waste heat and turning it into electrical power. Taking advantage of quantum effects, the technology holds great promise for making ...

A material that most liquids won't wet

(Phys.org)—A nanoscale coating that's at least 95 percent air repels the broadest range of liquids of any material in its class, causing them to bounce off the treated surface, according to the University of Michigan engineering ...

Is the ozone layer on the road to recovery?

(Phys.org)—Satellites show that the recent ozone hole over Antarctica was the smallest seen in the past decade. Long-term observations also reveal that Earth's ozone has been strengthening following international agreements ...

US wants to move on climate change

(AP) -- The Obama administration, in a major environmental policy shift, is leaning toward asking 195 nations that ratified the U.N. ozone treaty to enact mandatory reductions in hydrofluorocarbons, according to U.S. officials ...

Termite insecticide a potent greenhouse gas

(PhysOrg.com) -- An insecticide used to fumigate termite-infested buildings is a strong greenhouse gas that lives in the atmosphere nearly 10 times longer than previously thought, UC Irvine research has found.

page 1 from 2

Haloalkane

The haloalkanes (also known as halogenoalkanes or alkyl halides) are a group of chemical compounds, consisting of alkanes, such as methane or ethane, with one or more halogens linked, such as chlorine or fluorine, making them a type of organic halide. They are a subset of the halocarbons, similar to haloalkenes and haloaromatics. They are known under many chemical and commercial names. As flame retardants, fire extinguishants, refrigerants, propellants and solvents they have or had wide use. Some haloalkanes (those containing chlorine or bromine) have been shown to have negative effects on the environment such as ozone depletion. The most widely known family within this group is the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA