Researchers discover how chlamydia takes up new DNA from host

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chlamydia trachomatis is the most commonly reported sexually transmitted bacterial disease in the U.S., totaling 1.7 million cases in 2017. Rates are highest among ...

New rapid DNA test to diagnose chlamydia infection in koalas

A new DNA test to detect chlamydia infection in koalas which can be run in the field and gives on-the-spot results within 30 minutes has been developed in a research collaboration between researchers from Queensland University ...

Kangaroo Island koalas may save the koala species

South Australia's Kangaroo Island koalas have been found to be free from the disease that is threatening koala populations around Australia, particularly in Australia's north-east where populations are declining dramatically.

Organoids reveal inflammatory processes in chlamydia infections

For a long time, researchers were only able to examine human cells infected with bacteria by using cancer cell lines. However, these transformed cells often give a false impression of the infection process. Fallopian tube ...

Chlamydia attacks with Frankenstein protein

When Chlamydia trachomatis, the bacterium that causes one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide, infects a human cell, it hijacks parts of the host to build protective layers around itself.

Treating koalas for chlamydia alters gut microbes

Koalas are one of Australia's iconic animals, but they have been hard hit by an epidemic of Chlamydia infections contributing to a steep decline in numbers. Sick koalas brought to wildlife hospitals may be treated with antibiotics ...

Using synthetic biology for chlamydia vaccines

A multidisciplinary scientific team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made significant advances in developing a vaccine for chlamydia using synthetic biology, sponsored by a two-year National Institutes ...

Chlamydia—how bacteria take control

To survive in human cells, chlamydiae have a lot of tricks in store. Researchers of the University of Würzburg have now discovered that the bacterial pathogens also manipulate the cells' energy suppliers in the process.

Vaccine 'success' raises hopes of saving koalas from chlamydia

Australian scientists said Wednesday they have successfully tested a vaccine against chlamydia in wild koalas, in what they believe is a breakthrough in combating the sexually-transmitted disease ravaging the native marsupial.

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