Related topics: plants

Fewer students study botany, more plant collections closing

The teeming plant world could become a virtual mystery in the coming decades as college students increasingly shy away from studying botany and universities across the U.S. shutter their long-standing herbaria.

Agricultural policy change drives increased pollination demand

Research involving botanists from Trinity College Dublin has shown that the demand for financially critical pollination services has risen five times as fast as the number of honeybee colonies across Europe. The mismatch ...

Hunting species: Not just a numbers game

In the race to describe all of Earth's species before they go extinct it has been suggested that one species that is thriving is taxonomists.

What can plants reveal about global climate change?

Recently, climate change, including global warming, has been a "hot" news item as many regions of the world have experienced increasingly intense weather patterns, such as powerful hurricanes and extended floods or droughts. ...

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Botany

Botany, plant science(s), or plant biology is a branch of biology that involves the scientific study of plant life. Traditionally, botany also included the study of fungi, algae and viruses. Botany covers a wide range of scientific disciplines including structure, growth, reproduction, metabolism, development, diseases, chemical properties, and evolutionary relationships among taxonomic groups. Botany began with early human efforts to identify edible, medicinal and poisonous plants, making it one of the oldest branches of science. Today botanists study over 550,000 species of living organisms.

The term "botany" comes from Greek βοτάνη, meaning "pasture, grass, fodder", perhaps via the idea of a livestock keeper needing to know which plants are safe for livestock to eat.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA