Related topics: volcano

Image: Taal volcano blanketed by ash

The Philippines' Taal volcano erupted on 12 January 2020—spewing an ash plume approximately 15 km high and forcing large-scale evacuations in the nearby area.

Volcano Raikoke spits ash over Bering Sea

An unexpected and powerful eruption started at Raikoke volcano in the Kuril Islands on 21 June 2019. This image, which was captured on 22 June, shows the brown ash plumes rising high above the dense clouds—drifting eastwards ...

Red sky in sight shows charging at height

The Saharan dust cloud that cast a red glow over the UK last autumn helped scientists to take a step forward in understanding how to prepare for future volcanic eruptions.

Scientists capture sounds of volcanic thunder

Researchers report in a new study that they've documented rumblings of volcanic thunder for the first time, a feat considered nearly impossible by many volcanologists.

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Eruption column

An eruption column consists of hot volcanic ash emitted during an explosive volcanic eruption. The ash forms a column rising many kilometres into the air above the peak of the volcano. In the most explosive eruptions, the eruption column may rise over 40 km, penetrating the stratosphere. Stratospheric injection of aerosols by volcanoes is a major cause of short-term climate change.

A common occurrence in explosive eruptions is for column collapse to occur. In this case, the eruption column is too dense to be lifted high into the air by air convection, and instead falls down the flanks of the volcano to form a pyroclastic flow or surge.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA