Argentine ant genome sheds light on a successful pest

(PhysOrg.com) -- A research team led by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and San Francisco State University has unlocked the genetic code of the highly invasive Argentine ant, providing clues as to why ...

How Social Insects Recognize Dead Nestmates

(PhysOrg.com) -- When an ant dies in an ant nest or near one, its body is quickly picked up by living ants and removed from the colony, thus limiting the risk of colony infection by pathogens from the corpse.

For global invasion, Argentine ants use chemical weapons

From their native home on the banks of South America's Paraná River, Argentine ants have conquered six continents and many oceanic islands. Their success is explained by several factors: they have more than one queen per ...

Using seaweed to kill invasive ants

Scientists at the University of California, Riverside have developed an inexpensive, biodegradable, seaweed-based ant bait that can help homeowners and farmers control invasive Argentine ant populations.

Invasive ants found to carry novel virus and honey bee pathogens

A group of scientists, led by Victoria University of Wellington's Professor Phil Lester, has discovered that invasive Argentine ants frequently carry a previously undescribed virus. These exotic ants also host a virus widely ...

All together now: A lesson from Space Station 'ant-stronauts'

A recent study on the International Space Station brings to mind Aesop's fable of the Ant and the Grasshopper, and it is pretty amazing what we can learn from these industrious insects. The activities of a crew of ants that ...

Study shows pesticides make some ants more aggressive

Research carried out at Victoria University of Wellington shows that exposure to some commonly used pesticides makes an invasive ant species more aggressive and more likely to survive conflict with a native ant species.

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