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Rice University scientists have taken the next step toward the deployment of powerful, rechargeable lithium metal batteries by making them safer and simpler to manufacture.

Simple and low-cost crack-healing of ceramic-based composites

A team of researchers at Osaka University demonstrated that cracks induced in composites consisting of alumina ( Al2O3) ceramics and titanium (Ti) as dispersed phase could be healed at room temperature, a world first. This ...

Pushing lithium ion batteries to the next performance level

Conventional lithium ion batteries, such as those widely used in smartphones and notebooks, have reached performance limits. Materials chemist Freddy Kleitz from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna and international ...

Pressure helps to make better Li-ion batteries

Lithium titanium oxide (Li4Ti5O12, LTO), a "zero-strain" anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs), exhibits excellent cycling performance. However, it shows poor conductivity, which is the major drawback and limits its ...

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Anode

An anode is an electrode through which electric current flows into a polarized electrical device. Mnemonic: ACID (Anode Current Into Device). Electrons flow in the opposite direction to the electric current (flow of hypothetical positive charge)

A widespread misconception[citation needed] is that anode polarity is always positive. This is often incorrectly inferred from the correct fact that in all electrochemical devices negatively charged anions move towards the anode (hence their name) and/or positively charged cations move away from it. In fact anode polarity depends on the device type, and sometimes even in which mode it operates, as per the above electric current direction-based universal definition. Consequently, as can be seen from the following examples, in a device which consumes power the anode is positive, and in a device which provides power the anode is negative:

An electrode through which current flows the other way (out of the device) is termed a cathode.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA