Related topics: google · robot · search engine

AI algorithm keeps a mile-long particle accelerator healthy

Particle accelerators are among the most intricate scientific instruments ever devised. With millions of sensors and thousands of subsystems at risk of failure, these accelerators' human operators must continuously monitor ...

Algorithm for AI enables low-cost tracking of invasive plant

To manage johnsongrass, a noxious weed that crowds out cotton and sickens horses, farmers have tried herbicides, burning and hand-pulling. Now, researchers at University of California, Davis, have developed a more high-tech ...

AI model directly compares properties of potential new drugs

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed an AI platform that autonomously compares molecules and learns from their variations to anticipate property differences critical to discovering new pharmaceuticals. The ...

page 1 from 40

Algorithm

In mathematics, computing, linguistics, and related subjects, an algorithm is a finite sequence of instructions, an explicit, step-by-step procedure for solving a problem, often used for calculation and data processing. It is formally a type of effective method in which a list of well-defined instructions for completing a task, will when given an initial state, proceed through a well-defined series of successive states, eventually terminating in an end-state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as probabilistic algorithms, incorporate randomness.

A partial formalization of the concept began with attempts to solve the Entscheidungsproblem (the "decision problem") posed by David Hilbert in 1928. Subsequent formalizations were framed as attempts to define "effective calculability" (Kleene 1943:274) or "effective method" (Rosser 1939:225); those formalizations included the Gödel-Herbrand-Kleene recursive functions of 1930, 1934 and 1935, Alonzo Church's lambda calculus of 1936, Emil Post's "Formulation 1" of 1936, and Alan Turing's Turing machines of 1936–7 and 1939.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA