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New lensless camera creates 3D images from a single exposure

Researchers have developed a camera that uses a thin microlens array and new image processing algorithms to capture 3D information about objects in a scene with a single exposure. The camera could be useful for a variety ...

Opinion: The algorithm, a tool against populist rhetoric

There is no shortage of critiques concerning the use of AI in public decision-making processes. Scholars, for example, have described algorithms as a "toxic cocktail for democracy" by pointing at the ever-growing availability ...

A machine for sorting zebrafish eggs

Zebrafish eggs are among the most commonly used model organisms in genetic, developmental and toxicology research. A device developed by EPFL spin-off Bionomous cuts the time it takes to sort these embryos from several hours ...

Quantum annealing can beat classical computing in limited cases

Recent research proves that under certain conditions, quantum annealing computers can run algorithms—including the well-known Shor's algorithm—more quickly than classical computers. In most cases, however, quantum annealing ...

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Algorithm

In mathematics, computing, linguistics, and related subjects, an algorithm is a finite sequence of instructions, an explicit, step-by-step procedure for solving a problem, often used for calculation and data processing. It is formally a type of effective method in which a list of well-defined instructions for completing a task, will when given an initial state, proceed through a well-defined series of successive states, eventually terminating in an end-state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as probabilistic algorithms, incorporate randomness.

A partial formalization of the concept began with attempts to solve the Entscheidungsproblem (the "decision problem") posed by David Hilbert in 1928. Subsequent formalizations were framed as attempts to define "effective calculability" (Kleene 1943:274) or "effective method" (Rosser 1939:225); those formalizations included the Gödel-Herbrand-Kleene recursive functions of 1930, 1934 and 1935, Alonzo Church's lambda calculus of 1936, Emil Post's "Formulation 1" of 1936, and Alan Turing's Turing machines of 1936–7 and 1939.

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