Related topics: climate change · atmosphere · nasa · climate models · climate

New imaging spectrometer surveys atmospheric dust from the ISS

Scientists on Earth will soon see our planet's atmospheric dust sources in high resolution, as a new state-of-the-art imaging spectrometer—developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Cornell University—aims ...

Light amplification accelerates chemical reactions in aerosols

Aerosols in the atmosphere react to incident sunlight. This light is amplified in the interior of the aerosol droplets and particles, accelerating reactions. ETH researchers have now been able to demonstrate and quantify ...

Revealing an overlooked source for marine cloud nuclei

Sea spray aerosols (SSAs) produced via bubble burst on the interface of atmosphere and ocean, are an important component in the Earth's climate system and constitute a major source of uncertainty in predicting future climate.

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Aerosol

Technically, an aerosol is a suspension of fine solid particles or liquid droplets in a gas. Examples are smoke, oceanic haze, air pollution, smog and CS gas. In general conversation, aerosol usually refers to an aerosol spray can or the output of such a can. The word aerosol derives from the fact that matter "floating" in air is a suspension (a mixture in which solid or liquid or combined solid-liquid particles are suspended in a fluid). To differentiate suspensions from true solutions, the term sol evolved—originally meant to cover dispersions of tiny (sub-microscopic) particles in a liquid. With studies of dispersions in air, the term aerosol evolved and now embraces both liquid droplets, solid particles, and combinations of these.

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