The University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW Madison) was established in 1848 in Madison, Wisconsin. UW Madison is the flagship of the University of Wisconsin system. It enrolls more than 40,000 undergraduate, graduate and professional students. It is rated by Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Learning as RU/VH which means very high research activity. UW-Madison is rated 17th among universities world-wide and 15th in the Americas by Shanghai Jiao Tong Universities ranking. UW Madison has an exceptional biochemistry, medical and science related graduate division. UW Madison is credited with discovering Vitamin A and Vitamin B by Professor McCollum and cell biologist James Thomson first isolated and cultured embryonic stem cells.

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http://www.wisc.edu/
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Wisconsin-Madison

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Making biominerals: Nature's recipe is old, evolved more than once

In recent years, scientists have teased out many of the secrets of biomineralization, the process by which sea urchins grow spines, mollusks build their shells and corals make their skeletons, not to mention how mammals and ...

Lessons of conventional imaging let scientists see around corners

Along with flying and invisibility, high on the list of every child's aspirational superpowers is the ability to see through or around walls or other visual obstacles. That capability is now a big step closer to reality as ...

Thanks to science, parasite can have sex in mice, not just cats

Toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled parasite perhaps best known for its ability to trick mice into taking potentially fatal risks around cats and, in humans, as a serious threat to fetal health, has given up a long-held secret ...

Researchers probe cell division defects to gain insight into cancer

From bugs to plants to animals, for all living things to grow they must create more cells. To do so, each existing cell, whether in an embryo or an adult, receives cues to copy its chromosomes—large pieces of DNA that contain ...

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