Bioinformaticians examine new genes the moment they are born

Accumulating evidence suggests that new genes can arise spontaneously from previously non-coding DNA instead of through the gradual mutation of established genes. Bioinformaticians at the University of Münster (Germany) ...

Symmetrical cleavage of disulphides is fast and biocompatible

A team of researchers led by Prof. Frank Glorius and Michael Teders from the University of Münster and by Prof. Dirk Guldi from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg have presented a new chemical reaction path which may prove ...

Mathematician discusses solving a seemingly unsolvable equation

After 10 years, Prof. Raimar Wulkenhaar from the University of Münster's Mathematical Institute and his colleague Dr. Erik Panzer from the University of Oxford have solved a mathematical equation which was considered to ...

New insights into the inner clock of the fruit fly

Several months ago, professors Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young received the Nobel Prize for their work on deciphering the mechanisms of the biological clock. Many other scientists around the world are also ...

How scientists analyze cell membranes

Exchange of material and information at the level of individual cells requires transport and signaling at the level of the plasma membrane enclosing the cell. Studying mechanisms at such tiny dimensions presents researchers ...

Archaeologists post research data from Sudan online

The University of Münster's Institute of Egyptology and Coptology (Germany) is now uploading data gathered between 2009 and 2016 during field research in Sudan regarding graves, small huts and stone-lined sleeping places ...

Labeling and detecting RNA modifications

What happens in a cell when genetic information is translated into proteins? In order to study this process, researchers study one particular biomolecule inside the cell: messenger ribonucleic acid, mRNA for short. This biomolecule ...

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