American Society of Agronomy

The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) is a scientific and professional society of agronomists and scientists of related disciplines, principally in the United States but with a large number of non-U.S. members as well. It was founded in 1907 with the objective of 'the increase and dissemination of knowledge concerning soils, crops, and the conditions affecting them.' One of its founding members was Charles Piper, who would become its president in 1914. The first president was Mark A. Carlton and the first annual meeting was held in Washington, D.C., in 1908. Two daughter societies were subsequently formed, the Soil Science Society of America and the Crop Science Society of America. The ASA is headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin, and publishes a number of scientific journals. The ASA holds annual meetings attended by thousands of its members.

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Tracking wastewater's path to wells, groundwater

We often "flush it and forget it" when it comes to waste from toilets and sinks. However, it's important to be able to track this wastewater to ensure it doesn't end up in unwanted places. A group of Canadian scientists has ...

date4 hours ago in Environment
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Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a win

Meet alfalfa, a perennial legume used mainly as high-quality feed for dairy cattle. Alfalfa is also used as feed for beef cattle, horses, sheep, and goats. It's high in protein (16-20% crude protein). It contains a lot of ...

dateJan 03, 2018 in Environment
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Cranberry growers tart on phosphorus

At Thanksgiving, many Americans look forward to eating roast turkey, pumpkin pie, and tangy red cranberries. To feed that appetite, cranberry farming is big business. In Massachusetts, cranberries are the most valuable food ...

dateNov 29, 2017 in Environment
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Filling intercropping info gap

Two crops or one? Sometimes, growing two crops simultaneously on the same piece of land - called intercropping - can benefit farmers. But it needs careful planning and resource management.

dateNov 15, 2017 in Environment
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