American Society of Agronomy

The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) is a scientific and professional society of agronomists and scientists of related disciplines, principally in the United States but with a large number of non-U.S. members as well. It was founded in 1907 with the objective of 'the increase and dissemination of knowledge concerning soils, crops, and the conditions affecting them.' One of its founding members was Charles Piper, who would become its president in 1914. The first president was Mark A. Carlton and the first annual meeting was held in Washington, D.C., in 1908. Two daughter societies were subsequently formed, the Soil Science Society of America and the Crop Science Society of America. The ASA is headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin, and publishes a number of scientific journals. The ASA holds annual meetings attended by thousands of its members.

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Breeding beans that resist weevils

Beans are awesome. They are packed with nutrients and are high in protein. They can grow in many different environments. They help replenish soil nitrogen levels. They are a vital crop for food security in many parts of the ...

dateOct 24, 2018 in Ecology
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Boxing up ag field nitrogen

Spring in America's heartland is often wet. That makes its soil too soft for planting. One solution to that issue is tile drainage. Growers insert a series of pipes (drain tiles) under their fields, which drains water from ...

dateOct 10, 2018 in Environment
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'Ground coffee' with soil perks in Brazil

Coffee is one of Brazil's biggest crops. Brazil's favorable climate helps coffee beans ripen and be ready for picking during a concentrated period of weeks. This makes mechanical harvesting an economically reasonable choice.

dateSep 24, 2018 in Environment
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