The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) is a learned society that was founded on December 26, 1906 at a meeting organized by John Jacob Abel (Johns Hopkins University). The roots of the society were in the American Physiological Society, which had been formed some 20 years earlier. The ASBMB was originally called the American Society of Biological Chemists, before obtaining its current name in 1987. The society is based in Rockville, Maryland. ASBMB's mission is to advance the science of biochemistry and molecular biology through publication of scientific and educational journals, the organization of scientific meetings, advocacy for funding of basic research and education, support of science education at all levels, and by promoting the diversity of individuals entering the scientific workforce. The organization currently has over 12,000 members.

Website
http://www.asbmb.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Society_for_Biochemistry_and_Molecular_Biology

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An unusual form of antibiotic resistance in pandemic cholera

Cholera is a devastating disease for millions worldwide, primarily in developing countries, and the dominant type of cholera today is naturally resistant to one type of antibiotic usually used as a treatment of last resort.

Bacterial protein mimics DNA to sabotage cells' defenses

Infections with Salmonella bacteria, often caused by eating or handling undercooked meat or eggs, affect about 100 million people a year worldwide. The suffering the infection causes—abdominal cramps, fever and diarrhea—is ...

The secret sulfate code that lets the bad Tau in

Vampires can turn humans into vampires, but to enter a human's house, they must be invited in. Researchers at the UT Southwestern Medical Center, writing in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, have uncovered details of how ...

Looking for an off switch for celiac disease

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects by some estimates nearly 1 in 100 people. Celiac disease symptoms are triggered by gluten, a protein found in wheat and related plants, but gluten doesn't act alone to ...

New insight into the molecular weapons of the plant microbiome

Like all organisms, plants are associated with bacterial communities in which helpful and harmful bacteria compete for dominance. Among the weaponry of these warring bacteria are molecular syringes that some bacteria can ...

An RNA key that unlocks innate immunity

RNA has long been the neglected middle child of biomolecules, the go-between between DNA, which encodes the cell's instructions, and proteins, which carry them out. Increasingly, though, researchers are recognizing RNA as ...

How just drops of viper venom pack a deadly punch

A bite from a lancehead snake can be fatal. Species in the family, found throughout Central and South America, have venom that can disrupt blood clotting and cause hemorrhage, strokes and kidney failure.

A phospholipid pathway from plants to parasites

Recent findings by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis may aid in the development of therapies to treat parasitic infections, including malaria, and may help plant scientists one day produce hardier crops. The ...

How pathogenic bacteria prepare a sticky adhesion protein

Researchers at Harvard Medical School, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of Georgia have described how the protein that allows strep and staph bacteria to stick to human cells is prepared and ...

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