Video: NASA tracks COVID-19's atmospheric fingerprint

Video: NASA tracks COVID-19's atmospheric fingerprint
Credit: Music: The Mysterious Staircase by Brice Davoli [SACEM], Suspended in Time by Brice Davoli [SACEM], Universal Production Music Kazuyuki Miyazaki (JPL): Lead Scientist Kevin Bowman (JPL): Scientist Lesley Ott (NASA/GSFC): Lead Scientist Brad Weir (USRA): Scientist Katie Jepson (KBRwyle): Lead Producer Trent L. Schindler (USRA): Lead Visualizer Ellen T. Gray (ADNET): Writer Jessica Merzdorf Evans (NASA/GSFC): Writer Katie Jepson (KBRwyle): Narration

The COVID-19-related lockdowns granted scientists an unexpected and detailed glimpse as to how human activities impact atmospheric composition.

Two recent studies, one focusing on nitrogen oxide and the other examining CO2 concentrations, were able to detect the atmospheric "fingerprint" of the lockdowns in unprecedented detail.

Credit: Music: The Mysterious Staircase by Brice Davoli [SACEM], Suspended in Time by Brice Davoli [SACEM], Universal Production Music Kazuyuki Miyazaki (JPL): Lead Scientist Kevin Bowman (JPL): Scientist Lesley Ott (NASA/GSFC): Lead Scientist Brad Weir (USRA): Scientist Katie Jepson (KBRwyle): Lead Producer Trent L. Schindler (USRA): Lead Visualizer Ellen T. Gray (ADNET): Writer Jessica Merzdorf Evans (NASA/GSFC): Writer Katie Jepson (KBRwyle): Narration

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Citation: Video: NASA tracks COVID-19's atmospheric fingerprint (2022, June 24) retrieved 15 August 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-06-video-nasa-tracks-covid-atmospheric.html
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