NASA rocket carrying solar X-ray scanner set to launch

Soon to launch: NASA rocket carrying solar X-ray scanner
Patrick Champey, an optical engineer in the Engineering Directorate at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, grabs a selfie with the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer, or MaGIXS, during integrated payload testing at Marshall’s world-class X-ray & Cryogenic Facility. Credit: NASA

The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer, or MaGIXS, mission is about to take flight. The launch window opens at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico on July 30.

Led by Dr. Amy Winebarger at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, MaGIXS will fly aboard a sounding rocket, a that lifts above Earth's atmosphere for a few minutes in space before falling back to Earth for recovery.

MaGIXS is a specialized scientific instrument designed to peer at the Sun in X-ray light that is invisible to the human eye. Focusing in on the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona, MaGIXS will scan an active region—where solar eruptions such as flares and often form—to measure its X-ray emissions in high resolution. The data will help scientists understand how active regions form and become heated to multi-million degree temperatures.


Explore further

NASA rocket chasing the source of the sun's hot atmosphere

Citation: NASA rocket carrying solar X-ray scanner set to launch (2021, July 29) retrieved 23 September 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2021-07-nasa-rocket-solar-x-ray-scanner.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
374 shares

Feedback to editors