Mid-mass black hole hurls star across the Milky Way

Mid-mass black hole hurls star across the Milky Way
Credit: A. Irrgang, Fau

An international team of astronomers has pinpointed the origin of a runaway high-velocity star named PG 1610+062 and determined that it was likely ejected from its birth cluster with the help of a mid-mass black hole (MMBH).

The findings are published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

In order to put tight constraints on PG 1610+062's projected rotational velocity, its radial velocity, as well as measure its accurately, the team needed spectral data of the star, but its distance and position in the sky made W. M. Keck Observatory's Echellette Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) the only tool for the job.

"In the , only the combination of Keck Observatory and ESI gave us what we needed. The collecting area of Keck allowed us to gather enough photons for our object and ESI has exactly the right resolution, which is high enough to resolve all the spectral features," says co-author Thomas Kupfer, a Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

While formerly considered an old star with half a solar mass, typical for the galactic halo, the Keck Observatory data revealed that PG1610+062 is actually a surprisingly young star that's ten times more massive, ejected from the Galactic disk almost at the escape velocity from the Milky Way.

Some even faster , called hyper-velocity stars (HVSs), do exist—the first three were discovered in 2005. Among them is the unique star US 708, which was found from observations using the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on the Keck I telescope; it was going so fast it escaped the Milky Way's gravitational pull. To achieve such velocities requires an extremely dramatic slingshot event.

Mid-mass black hole hurls star across the Milky Way
Young, massive stars like PG 1610+062 in the Milky Way’s galactic halo live far from our galaxy’s star-forming regions. Astronomers are trying to understand how these ‘runaway stars’ were forced to leave their birth place. New observations of PG 1610+062 suggest that a mid-sized black hole in the Milky Way may be responsible for evicting the star from its home cluster. Credit: A. Irrgang, Fau

Simulations carried out in 1988 suggested that a giant, 4 million solar mass black hole (SMBH) could do the trick. By disrupting a binary star system, i.e. swallowing one star and leaving its stellar partner with all the energy in the system, ejecting it far beyond the escape velocity of the Milky Way. Lacking other plausible explanations for the formation of HVSs, this scenario was readily accepted as the standard ejection mechanism, in particular after observational evidence for the existence of such a SMBH at the Galactic Center became overwhelming in the early 2000s.

By using the European Space Agency's Gaia spacecraft's unprecedented astrometric precision measurements, PG1610+062 has been traced back to nowhere near the Galactic Center, but to the Sagittarius spiral arm of our galaxy, therefore ruling out the idea that the Galactic Center SMBH slingshot the star.

Even more interesting is the derived extreme acceleration of PG1610+062, which excludes most likely all alternative scenarios except the interaction with a MMBH. Such objects have been predicted to exist in young stellar clusters in the spiral arms of the Milky Way, but none has been detected yet.

"Now, PG1610+062 may provide evidence that MMBHs could indeed exist in our galaxy. The race is on to actually find them," says lead author Andreas Irrgang of the Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in Germany.

There is plenty more to learn about this star and its place of origin. As the Gaia mission proceeds, precision will improve and the place of origin will be narrowed down further, possibly allowing astronomers to search for the parent star cluster and ultimately for the black hole.

The team, which includes Felix Fürst of the European Space Astronomy Centre in Spain, Stephan Geier of the Institute of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Potsdam in Germany, and Ulrich Heber of the Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, is currently searching for additional candidates similar to PG1610+062 using Gaia and other large survey telescopes. The brighter, closer ones might be suitable for tracing back to cores of star clusters, which might provide evidence of intermediate mass black holes in their centers.


Explore further

Researchers confirm massive hyper-runaway star ejected from the Milky Way Disk

More information: A. Irrgang et al. PG 1610+062: a runaway B star challenging classical ejection mechanisms, Astronomy & Astrophysics (2019). DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201935429
Journal information: Astronomy & Astrophysics

Citation: Mid-mass black hole hurls star across the Milky Way (2019, September 10) retrieved 18 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-09-mid-mass-black-hole-hurls-star.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
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Sep 10, 2019
shall I assume that "medium mass black hole" is the same thing as an "intermediate mass black hole"?

Sep 10, 2019
More imaginary conjecture from the plasma ignoramuses, must be pop-sci-fi day.

Sep 10, 2019
shall I assume that "medium mass black hole" is the same thing as an "intermediate mass black hole"?


For whatever reason this article refers to them as "mid-mass black holes", the actual paper uses the common IMBH.

More imaginary conjecture from the plasma ignoramuses, must be pop-sci-fi day.


I hope you are payed to bait on this website, if you aren't actually a crazy person I don't see why you would waste your time otherwise.

Sep 10, 2019
@cantdrive85

I, for one, would be willing to entertain your comments if you would post actual science-based explanations for phenomena such as discussed in this article, rather than what you (alone it seems) seem to think passes for clever, witty, commentary.

So, provide a science based explanation for the high velocity of this star and hyper-velocity stars. Failing your doing that, I echo CirclesBeginning's comments and conclude you also failed clown college in addition to basic physics.

Sep 10, 2019
Blackholes Hurl Stars across this Milkyway

Not content with munching on these galactic stars, never to be seen again
Apparently blackholes
Have fore gone their traditional role
Of not letting one morsel to ever see this light of day ever again
These blackholes
Have taking it upon themselves to hurling these stars
Out this galactic galaxy
Ejected from their home land
Banished fore to never return again
Fore these stars
Thateth displeaseth this blackhole
Are banished to this desolation these miscreant stars deserve
This desolation of this desolate vacuous vacuum of space

Sep 10, 2019
I hope you are payed to bait on this website, if you aren't actually a crazy person I don't see why you would waste your time otherwise.


Conspiracy theorists do this. If you tell yourself the same lie enough times, you start to believe it, and this process is necessary for swallowing the EU dogma.

So, provide a science based explanation for the high velocity of this star and hyper-velocity stars. Failing your doing that, I... conclude you also failed clown college in addition to basic physics.


Don't bother. I've asked earnestly on several occasions for explanations on the observed orbits of stars like S2, and ow they may come from toroidal plasmoids, but that's where the conversation seems to end every time.

Sep 10, 2019
Don't bother. I've asked earnestly on several occasions for explanations on the observed orbits of stars like S2, and ow they may come from toroidal plasmoids, but that's where the conversation seems to end every time.

I have given jonesdumb this answer numerous times, forgive me if I ignore your parroting of jonesdumb's nonsense.

Sep 10, 2019
Don't bother. I've asked earnestly on several occasions for explanations on the observed orbits of stars like S2, and ow they may come from toroidal plasmoids, but that's where the conversation seems to end every time.

I have given jonesdumb this answer numerous times, forgive me if I ignore your parroting of jonesdumb's nonsense.


Is a lie. You have never answered it, because there is no answer. Only a complete loon would think a black hole is a plasmoid!

Sep 10, 2019
I have given jonesdumb this answer numerous times, forgive me if I ignore your parroting of jonesdumb's nonsense.


I'm not that person, and I'm not going to comb through every discourse you've had to figure out where the relevant information is, when you can quickly post a link. Also, I'm not parroting his question, as I've never seen it posed - it's a legitimate (and obvious) question.

Sep 10, 2019
I'm not that person, and I'm not going to comb through every discourse you've had to figure out where the relevant information is, when you can quickly post a link. Also, I'm not parroting his question, as I've never seen it posed - it's a legitimate (and obvious) question.


Quite so. This comes back to recent woo claims by one Wallace Thornhill, EUist, liar and general nobody; and Eric Lerner, plasma cosmologist, non-astrophysicist, mucks about in a lab.
I am not going to link to their woo, but Lerner put a series of videos on youtube (where else!) claiming this plasmoid woo soon after the detection of the EH at M87. Nowhere does he address the observed mass estimates of M87 made prior to the EH detection, based on stellar orbits. Nowhere does he address the close correlation of these estimates with the mass derived from the EHT observations. Nowhere does he (or anybody else) address the orbits of stars around Sgr A*.
It is pure woo from wooists.

Sep 10, 2019
As Stephen Hawking watched these Blackholes Hurl Stars across this Milkyway

Not content with munching on these galactic stars, never to be seen again
Have fore gone their traditional role
Taking it upon themselves to hurling these stars
Out this galactic galaxy
What does Stephen Hawking Think?
For all his life hath beeneth devoted to these fearsome blackholes
Where one star enters no star exits
For Stephen Hawking
Tried with all his earthly powers
Fore he tried and tried again and again
But Stephen Hawking just could not extract one single hair of these hairy blackholes
For now as Stephen Hawking watch's fore eternity
Strangely
Now Stephen Hawking is free to pass this mantle to younger more nimble folk
Now these blackholes are the antipathy of the blackholes Stephen Hawking knew
For these same blackholes when they're not ejecting stars out their spin-axis
They're flinging stars right out this galaxy

Certainly, not the Blackholes that Stephen Hawking, from his youth, got to know!

Sep 10, 2019
This comment has been removed by a moderator.

Sep 10, 2019
So, supposing black holes are really plasmoids, what's a plasmoid doing playing crack-the-whip with a star and accelerating it to relativistic speeds?

A plasmoid has an internal pressure stemming from both the gas pressure of the plasma and the magnetic pressure of the field. To maintain an approximately static plasmoid radius, this pressure must be balanced by an external confining pressure. In a field-free vacuum, for example, a plasmoid will rapidly expand and dissipate.


So where's the external confining pressure coming from?

Sep 10, 2019
"formerly considered an old star with half a solar mass, typical for the galactic halo, the Keck Observatory data revealed that PG1610+062 is actually a surprisingly young star that's ten times more massive, ejected from the Galactic disk almost at the escape velocity from the Milky Way."

"Some even faster stars, called hyper-velocity stars (HVSs), do exist—the first three were discovered in 2005. Among them is the unique star US 708, which was found from observations using the ... (LRIS) on the Keck I telescope; it was going so fast it escaped the Milky Way's gravitational pull. To achieve such velocities requires an extremely dramatic slingshot event."

These Stars that are thought "to achieve such velocities" are actually traveling at a normal velocity and have not been necessarily "kicked out", although some of them are moving too fast in their orbits that it seems as though they were 'kicked out'.
It's only the human concept of velocity that makes it seem to be so enormous.

Sep 10, 2019
So, supposing black holes are really plasmoids, what's a plasmoid doing playing crack-the-whip with a star and accelerating it to relativistic speeds?

A plasmoid has an internal pressure stemming from both the gas pressure of the plasma and the magnetic pressure of the field. To maintain an approximately static plasmoid radius, this pressure must be balanced by an external confining pressure. In a field-free vacuum, for example, a plasmoid will rapidly expand and dissipate.


So where's the external confining pressure coming from?


Well, the only thing that has been seen in the literature, was a paper by Eric Lerner back in the day, in one of the foremost astrophysics journals, 'Laser & Particle Beams'!

Read it at your own risk!

http://lppfusion....No-1.pdf


Sep 10, 2019
Yeah, I made it to where he denied gravity has anything to do with it. That was in the first paragraph. It's silliness. And as you claimed, he hasn't accounted for stars flying around at relativistic speeds.

Sep 10, 2019
I found this most interesting: http://www.badast...ind.html

And I still don't have any explanation for how plasmoids are slinging stars around at relativistic velocities.

Sep 10, 2019
Incidentally, I have handled a 10F capacitor, capable of storing 10,000C of charge. You wouldn't want to be anywhere close to such a thing when it's charged; pointing at it is strongly discouraged as you may make a low enough conduction pathway to get fried (and I mean real crispy critters, they won't need to cremate you, they can just spread the ashes). The entire Sun which contains 99% of the matter in the Solar System has at maximum 77C of charge. If you can put 100 times that much charge in a little tiny box a foot wide and two feet high, what does this say about the charge density of the Sun?

Incidentally, you wouldn't want to try to pick up the capacitor I'm talking about; you'd rupture yourself. It has casters so you can roll it around.

Sep 10, 2019
@SEU when you quote something you should include a link. Who the f are you quoting?


Sep 10, 2019
Here's a 2F 660V capacitor from GE; wire five of these up in parallel and you've got a 10F capacitor. Ten bucks apiece; US$50 for the ensemble, plus a bit of wire and your time to assemble it.

Sep 10, 2019
what i find most amusing about the woomongering of cant & silly & all the other looneyticks?

is that phenomena such as hypervelocity stars are simple gravitational caused events

described by the basic physics of Galileo & Newton

without the need to use 20th century physics to explain such simple ballistic motions

this is were the lack of intellectual competency or even primary level science education are so visibly displayed by the loons & trolls


Sep 10, 2019
@SEU when you quote something you should include a link. Who the f are you quoting?

says jimmybobo

I am not quoting anyone, bobo. I am producing some information that I am accustomed to knowing. Would you much rather that I did not share what I know?
Have you noticed that rrwillsj never ever offers any links to prove her assertions?

Sep 10, 2019
Yeah, I made it to where he denied gravity has anything to do with it. That was in the first paragraph. It's silliness. And as you claimed, he hasn't accounted for stars flying around at relativistic speeds.
says Schneib

When you say "stars flying around at relativistic speeds", how close to actually c are you speaking of here?

Sep 11, 2019
Funny. The .gif near the top of the page has me thinking of the American game of baseball. Am tempted to say, "and it's a Home Run". :)

Sep 11, 2019
Still no explanation of how plasmoids are hurling stars around.

Typical black hole liar denier EU liar denier bullshit.

Sep 11, 2019
Don't bother. I've asked earnestly on several occasions for explanations on the observed orbits of stars like S2, and ow they may come from toroidal plasmoids, but that's where the conversation seems to end every time.

I have given jonesdumb this answer numerous times, forgive me if I ignore your parroting of jonesdumb's nonsense.


More monkey dance from antigoracles socky, learn to drive first, then maybe we will find someone crazy enough to try and teach you science ;)

Sep 11, 2019
In search of Blackholes and Darkmatter: By Valeriy_polulyakh

And An Existence
Of BH's
Is a Hypothesis

Astrophysicists are relying on indirect observations
It would seem that the measurement
Of the event horizon

Of a black hole directly
Would be a direct evidence
However

By the nature of a horizon
Any real measurement
Of the event horizon will be indirect

The Event Horizon Telescope will get picture
Of the silhouette of the Sgr A*
Which is due to optical effects

Of spacetime outside of the event horizon
The result will be determined
By the simple quality

Of the resulting image
That does not depend
On the properties

Of the spacetime
Within the image
So, it will be also indirect

And an existence
Of BH's
Is a hypothesis

Sep 11, 2019
550 +/- 40 km/s will do for me.

https://arxiv.org...07.06375

Sep 11, 2019
And an existence Of BH's Is a hypothesis

In search of Blackholes and Darkmatter: By Valeriy_polulyakh
And An Existence
Of BH's
Is a Hypothesis

The Event Horizon Telescope will get a silhouette of the Sgr A* which is due to optical effects
Valeriy_polulyakh
As astrophysicists are relying on indirect observations
Stephen Hawking, if he was again mortal
Would agree with your assertion
That any image of this Blackhole
By this very nature of this event horizon and the correspond space time
This image has no other conclusion other than to be an indirect image

And an existence Of BH's Is a hypothesis

Sep 11, 2019
Runaway Disk Stars - Hypervelocity Disk Stars are beyond Classical Limits: A hyper-link by Da Schneib

These stars eventually escape this Milky Way
Fore it has been shown
That this popular Hills mechanism in which a binary system is disrupted

Via a close encounter
With this supermassive blackhole at our Galactic centre
May not be their only ejection mechanism

This analysis of this Gaia data
Has ruled out this Galactic central origin
For some of them

Has instead indicated that they are
Extreme Runaway Disk Stars
Which are ejected at velocities

Exceeding these predicted limits of classical
Dynamical ejection
From these star clusters or binary supernova ejection

This slowly pulsating runaway Disk Star
This late B-type MS star of 4-5 solar mass's
With a low projected rotational velocity

Fore PG 1610+062 was ejected from Carina-Sagittarius's spiral arm
At a velocity of 550km s−1
Which is Beyond these Classical Limits?

Hypervelocity Disk Stars are beyond Classical Limits

Sep 11, 2019
Yeah, I made it to where he denied gravity has anything to do with it. That was in the first paragraph. It's silliness. And as you claimed, he hasn't accounted for stars flying around at relativistic speeds.
says Schneib

When you say "stars flying around at relativistic speeds", how close to actually c are you speaking of here?


See the easily accessed data on the star S2 around Sgr A*.

https://phys.org/...ole.html

Sep 11, 2019
Disk Stars - Galactic Discs consist of these Galaxy's Stars

The stellar population of galactic discs
Tends to exhibit very little random motion
With most of its stars undergoing
Circular orbits about this galactic centre
Discs can be fairly thin
This disc material's motion
Lies predominantly on the plane of the disc
With very little vertical motion
As this Milky Way's Disc is 1 kpc thick

Fore it appeareths that these stars
Called Disk Stars
Are simply our galaxies stars
That exists in our galaxies central bulge
Where most of our galaxies stars live and breath

Fore galactic stars are in binary orbit with each other
Where their binary orbits take 250million years

For this is this reason why our Disk Stars exhibit very little motion!

Sep 11, 2019
Galactic Disk Stars in Binary Orbit

Fore galactic stars are in binary orbit with each other
Where their binary orbits take 250million years
For this is this reason why our Disk Stars exhibit very little motion!

This hyper-link quote

"Fore PG 1610+062 was ejected from Carina-Sagittarius's spiral arm
At a velocity of 550km s−1
Which is Beyond these Classical Limits?
Hypervelocity Disk Stars are beyond Classical Limits"

This study
https://arxiv.org...07.06375

Has clearly pointed out this well known fact
Disc Stars are in a 250million yearly binary orbit with each other
Which is why?
1, these Disk Stars exhibit very little motion
2, this why this 250milion yearly binary orbital period, is also this orbital period of all spiral galaxies

For where in this disc
Was Disc Star PG 1610+062
Located in our galaxies galactic bulge

As its location is this key, as to what star ejected, PG 1610+062 at of 550km s−1?

Sep 11, 2019
Incidentally, I have handled a 10F capacitor, capable of storing 10,000C of charge.
whoa what are you buildin' Da Schneib?

If you have a metal disk (with radius ~2m) what happens when you spin it up to ~30k rpm and charge it to ~50k volts? According to this patent (and the version of string theory cited therein) you should be able to measure a diminution in the inertial mass of proximal objects.

Sep 11, 2019
Incidentally, I have handled a 10F capacitor, capable of storing 10,000C of charge.
whoa what are you buildin' Da Schneib?



An Electric Sun!

Sep 11, 2019
I found this most interesting: http://www.badast...ind.html

And I still don't have any explanation for how plasmoids are slinging stars around at relativistic velocities.

Charge, that is how you move objects in an electric field. The runaway star has built up an excess charge and that is what is causing it to achieve such velocities. No hypothetical gravity monsters needed.

Sep 11, 2019
I found this most interesting: http://www.badast...ind.html

And I still don't have any explanation for how plasmoids are slinging stars around at relativistic velocities.

Charge, that is how you move objects in an electric field. The runaway star has built up an excess charge and that is what is causing it to achieve such velocities. No hypothetical gravity monsters needed.

Lol this can't get any funnier...Cant drive seems to have charged for the tree (again...), instead of the open road, it's lonely in the real world without his sockpuppet monsters hiding in his tree.

Sep 11, 2019
Charge, that is how you move objects in an electric field. The runaway star has built up an excess charge and that is what is causing it to achieve such velocities. No hypothetical gravity monsters needed.


Hahahahahahaha! So, perhaps you can do the calculations for the charges required. And tell us why the hell a star would build up an 'excess charge'? You are already relying on a fictional charge for the BH. And another for the star. You are relying on a fictional mechanism to explain the orbits. You are not explaining why gas and plasma are orbiting at ~ the same velocity. If a star is charged to x coulombs, and is orbiting at y m/s, what is the orbital speed of an H+ ion?

Or you could just save yourself the trouble, and admit that you are making up impossible sh!t!

Sep 11, 2019
I found this most interesting: http://www.badast...ind.html

And I still don't have any explanation for how plasmoids are slinging stars around at relativistic velocities.

Charge, that is how you move objects in an electric field. The runaway star has built up an excess charge and that is what is causing it to achieve such velocities. No hypothetical gravity monsters needed.
This statement implies that PG1610+062 has been accelerating out of the galaxy's gravity well as it builds up charge, which is *checks data* clearly not the case ...

Sep 11, 2019
Charge, that is how you move objects in an electric field. The runaway star has built up an excess charge and that is what is causing it to achieve such velocities. No hypothetical gravity monsters needed.
Additionally, the statement asserts a simple electrostatic modification of Newtonian dynamics, which, in lay terms, ain't happenin' ...

Sep 11, 2019
@SEU when you quote something you should include a link. Who the f are you quoting?



@jimmybobber

The voices in his head is who it is quoting.

Sep 11, 2019
Charge, that is how you move objects in an electric field. The runaway star has built up an excess charge and that is what is causing it to achieve such velocities. No hypothetical gravity monsters needed.


...... and you have the audacity to call everyone outside your cult an ignoramus.

Sep 11, 2019
This statement implies that PG1610+062 has been accelerating out of the galaxy's gravity well as it builds up charge, which is *checks data* clearly not the case ...


He's also implying that stars orbiting Sgr A flip charge frequently and consistently (or the "toroidal plasma"), such that they might have stable elliptical orbits. This is some heretofore unknown physics.

Sep 11, 2019
Incidentally, I have handled a 10F capacitor, capable of storing 10,000C of charge.
whoa what are you buildin' Da Schneib?
Radar. You should see the standoff insulators: 12 inches long.

Sep 11, 2019
Step out of a tenth floor window and then tell us how imaginary the gravity monsters are.

Sep 11, 2019
Step out of a tenth floor window and then tell us how imaginary the gravity monsters are.

You have a BH outside your window? That must be cool...

Sep 11, 2019
@SEU when you quote something you should include a link. Who the f are you quoting?
To avoid interacting with this freak, just drop what you think is a quote into google.

In this case we can see that, by claiming those as her own, shes a plagiarist. And of course a lying freak, which we already knew.

Sep 11, 2019
@cantdrive85.
The runaway star has built up an excess charge and that is what is causing it to achieve such velocities. No hypothetical gravity monsters needed.
Do you even stop to check how absurd your posts may be sometimes, mate?

CONSIDER: If what you claimed above was true, then we should be seeing such relativistic-velocity stars EVERYWHERE, not just the occasional 'gravitationally-slingshot' cases such as this one.

Or are you going to claim that there is something 'special' about these rare speeding stars that makes them 'charged' while the billions of other stars in our galaxy remain 'neutral'?

Please explain why ALL stars are NOT being hurled around likewise due to THEIR alleged 'charged' states.

Thanks. :)

Sep 11, 2019
Ok, ok, I'll settle this argument once and for all. That star ventured too close to the BH, got scared shitless and hightailed it out of there. I know that's what I would do.

Now before you bark at me, admit it. My post is just a tad less ridiculous than those that preceded it.

Sep 11, 2019
@RealityCheck
I have mentioned before in another phorum that the Stars must keep a decent amount of distance between each other to avoid collisions that could either cause a merger of 2 Stars, or a repulsion between 2 Stars, where one or the other could be 'kicked out' if it is repulsed. Perhaps the repulsion of 2 Stars from each other could depend on the charge of one or the other that repels one of the two. This is only a hypothesis, of course, but I think that the 'charge' has an effect if 2 Stars are too close together. What do you think?

Sep 12, 2019
https://www.resea...on_stars

Possibly a Neutron Star was repulsed and then 'kicked out'? Just a guess.

Sep 12, 2019
I still wanna know, if stars have such a low charge that we can't see it blazoned across the sky, there's enough to throw them around the galaxy at relativistic speeds. And I still don't have any answer from the plasmoids.

Sep 12, 2019
Yeah, I made it to where he denied gravity has anything to do with it. That was in the first paragraph. It's silliness. And as you claimed, he hasn't accounted for stars flying around at relativistic speeds.
says Schneib

When you say "stars flying around at relativistic speeds", how close to actually c are you speaking of here?

See the easily accessed data on the star S2 around Sgr A*.

https://phys.org/...ole.html
says CastroV

I read the link. But 2.5% the speed of light doesn't seem fast enough for a Star to get 'kicked out' by a Black Hole..
AFAIK, SO2 is still traveling close to the BH and being slingshot around and back again.
This other Star they're referring to is not within the immediate vicinity of SO2 and SgrA*. So they are searching for a different Black Hole, going on the premise that a Star can only travel at such a velocity under the influence of a BH.

Sep 12, 2019
As usual, conflation and dishonesty abound in yet another ridiculous post by @@cientologist_Sperm_Unit.

Nobody said it was the Milky Way SMBH. You made that up.

Nobody said all slingshot orbits eject anything at all.

Nobody said there are no black holes in the Milky Way but SgrA*.

And you still haven't answered what's flinging stars around.

Welp, fucked that one up, dincha?

Sep 12, 2019
Fore there are only stellar mass stars in these arms

Fore PG 1610+062 was ejected from Carina-Sagittarius's spiral arm

The answer lies in these transcribing

Carina-Sagittarius's spiral arm - a minor spiral arm of the Milky Way

Which implies very little mass?
There are no blackholes as big as Sagittarius*A
In these Milkyway's arms
Even if it had blackholes
In these galactic arms
Any blackholes will be stellar mass blackholes

For this reason
PG 1610+062, is at 4.5 stellar masses
Heavier than most Neutron stars
This miscreant star
PG 1610+062 is a mystery
Fore there are only stellar mass stars in these arms

for where is this corresponding star
Newton's law of action and reaction
Where one 4.5 stellar mass star goes
Requires another of 4.5 stellar mass star
Which means sling shot one binary star will sling shot PG 1610+062
Fore where is this binary star that we have missed?

and how did two stars in binary orbit slingshot one star, PG 1610+062 at 550 s−1?

Sep 12, 2019
Step out of a tenth floor window and then tell us how imaginary the gravity monsters are.


@Cant

Yes by all means step out and prove your point. It would impress the hell out of everybody.

Sep 12, 2019
On a related note;

Hypervelocity stars from star clusters hosting Intermediate-Mass Black Holes
Fragione, G. & Gualandris, A.
https://arxiv.org...08.07878

Published in MNRAS, 5 Sept. 2019.

Sep 12, 2019
What really gets me laughing is that people can know for sure they can't step out of a tenth floor window or they'll die, and they can't figure out that the same force makes planets and stars move. It's like they look out at the universe and figure it's all different out there. Especially when we've astrogated probes to Pluto. You have to be deeply stupid not to get it.

Sep 12, 2019
What really gets me laughing is that people can know for sure they can't step out of a tenth floor window or they'll die, and they can't figure out that the same force makes planets and stars move. It's like they look out at the universe and figure it's all different out there. Especially when we've astrogated probes to Pluto. You have to be deeply stupid not to get it.


Here's an idea; we've just sent the Parker Solar Probe towards the Sun. In the lunacy that counts as electric universe 'science', the Sun is positively charged, and powered by an incoming current of electrons. Well, we know that spacecraft generally charge up negative in space. Why power the PSP at all? Just let it charge up negative, and the positive Sun will do the rest, attracting the probe towards it!

Sep 12, 2019
Incidentally, I have HANDLED a 10F capacitor, capable of storing 10,000C of charge. You wouldn't want to be anywhere close to such a thing when it's charged; pointing at it is strongly discouraged ...

Aww....Da Schitebo. I'm certain that capacitor regrets meeting you. After the incident, he was hauled out, castrated and..I can't repeat all the other god awful things. Why? Because Da Schitebo handled him....fully charged...if you know what he means.

Sep 12, 2019
@tehgeighalgore gapes and farts and flaps again.

Sep 12, 2019
Maybe you'd like to talk about something other than buttholes next time.

You know, on the thread about astrophysics on the science site.

Just sayin'.

Sep 13, 2019
On a related note;

Hypervelocity stars from star clusters hosting Intermediate-Mass Black Holes
Fragione, G. & Gualandris, A.
https://arxiv.org...08.07878

Published in MNRAS, 5 Sept. 2019.

Mighty fine pseudoscientific claptrap right there...

Sep 13, 2019
I can see you haven't stepped out of the tenth floor window yet.

What's the matter? Think you might be wrong?

Sep 13, 2019
I can see you haven't stepped out of the tenth floor window yet.

What's the matter? Think you might be wrong?

That gravity exists in no way is proof of gravity monsters moron.

Sep 13, 2019
On a related note;

Hypervelocity stars from star clusters hosting Intermediate-Mass Black Holes
Fragione, G. & Gualandris, A.
https://arxiv.org...08.07878

Published in MNRAS, 5 Sept. 2019.

Mighty fine pseudoscientific claptrap right there...


Just because you are incapable of understanding it does not make it pseudoscientific! Which is a bit rich coming from someone who believes in the woo that you do!

Sep 13, 2019
I can see you haven't stepped out of the tenth floor window yet.

What's the matter? Think you might be wrong?

That gravity exists in no way is proof of gravity monsters moron.


Images of an event horizon are. Observations of stellar orbits around black holes are. Gravitational redshift of stars around BHs are.

Sep 13, 2019
So now @cantthink69 "thinks" that there's no gravity in space.

What an idiot. We sent a space probe to Pluto using gravity; it worked fine. Got there no problem.

Go ahead and show us the New Horizons orbital plot based on woo-woo plasma.

Sep 13, 2019
Not to mention you still haven't stepped out of that tenth floor window telling everyone you don't believe in "gravity monsters." Newton figured it out in the seventeenth century, after he realized that the orbits of the planets followed the same law as objects falling on Earth. You can't because you don't know any math.

Sep 13, 2019
So now @cantthink69 "thinks" that there's no gravity in space.

What an idiot. We sent a space probe to Pluto using gravity; it worked fine. Got there no problem.

Go ahead and show us the New Horizons orbital plot based on woo-woo plasma.

Nobody is denying gravity operates at the solar system scales, as Alfvén explained;
"Gravitational systems are the 'ashes' of prior electrical systems." Hannes Alfven
But gravitational guesswork fails miserably on larger scales not to mention the claims of infinite or near infinite density is but pure hypothetical conjecture.

Sep 13, 2019
So what is throwing stars around, if gravity operates at solar system scales?

Stars are a very great deal smaller than solar systems.

Sep 13, 2019
So now @cantthink69 "thinks" that there's no gravity in space.

What an idiot. We sent a space probe to Pluto using gravity; it worked fine. Got there no problem.

Go ahead and show us the New Horizons orbital plot based on woo-woo plasma.

Nobody is denying gravity operates at the solar system scales, as Alfvén explained;
"Gravitational systems are the 'ashes' of prior electrical systems." Hannes Alfven
But gravitational guesswork fails miserably on larger scales not to mention the claims of infinite or near infinite density is but pure hypothetical conjecture.


And the larger the scales, the more gravity dominates. That is why the only half way decent alternatives are/ were a modification of gravity. There is no other explanation.

Sep 13, 2019
So what is throwing stars around, if gravity operates at solar system scales?

Stars are a very great deal smaller than solar systems.

Stars are essentially the solar system in so much that the solar system is the extent of the stars influence.
And stars orbit galaxies due to EM effects, gravity has little to no effect at galactic scale.

Sep 13, 2019
@cantdrive85.
Stars are essentially the solar system in so much that the solar system is the extent of the stars influence. And stars orbit galaxies due to EM effects, gravity has little to no effect at galactic scale.
You realise that stars come from large and diffuse aggregations of gas/dust/plasma, yes? Then once the stars formed they would have the momentum/trajectory of the vortices that formed within that aggregate, yes? Hence the usual vortices that build the stars and planets also build the galaxies within which and around which the stars move in orbitals determined by the original locations/motions of the eddies that formed the stars. It's not so difficult. Consider: What do you get when you add sufficient Earth masses to create matter concentration of BH scale; and the gravitational gradient commensurate with that scale? If Earth has its commensurate associated mass/gravity, then so too will the BH which is built up of the requisite number of Earth masses, yes? :)

Sep 13, 2019
ps @cantdrive85.

You still haven't addressed this from me earlier:
CONSIDER: If what you claimed above was true, then we should be seeing such relativistic-velocity stars EVERYWHERE, not just the occasional 'gravitationally-slingshot' cases such as this one.

Or are you going to claim that there is something 'special' about these rare speeding stars that makes them 'charged' while the billions of other stars in our galaxy remain 'neutral'?

Please explain why ALL stars are NOT being hurled around likewise due to THEIR alleged 'charged' states.
Can you do me the courtesy of addressing it now; along with the point I made in my preceding post just above this ps? Thanks. :)

Sep 13, 2019
There are stars that orbit each other; in fact, nearly half of all star systems are multiple-star systems. Why is that different from planets orbiting a star?

Sep 13, 2019
So what is throwing stars around, if gravity operates at solar system scales?

Stars are a very great deal smaller than solar systems.

Stars are essentially the solar system in so much that the solar system is the extent of the stars influence.
And stars orbit galaxies due to EM effects, gravity has little to no effect at galactic scale.


You got that arse about face, woo boy! EM has zero effect at galactic scales. Well, as close to zero as makes no difference. It is dwarfed by gravity.
You know the galactic magnetic field strength. You know there cannot be a large charge on a star. Work out the gravitational versus EM effect of the Sun's galactic rotation. Or link me to where one of the EU geniuses has done this.

Sep 13, 2019
I read the link. But 2.5% the speed of light doesn't seem fast enough for a Star to get 'kicked out' by a Black Hole..
Pussytard, even you must realize that you're too stupid to be making that sort of judgement? Really, have you no self-awareness AT ALL?
NONE??

Wait - who was I asking again? "Pirouette, pussycat_eyes, russkiye, obama_socks, RitchieGuy01, racistblackguy, jewsrule, Surveillance_Egg_Unit"

-Oh yeah, right. The ewige imbecile.

Sep 13, 2019
@DaSchneib;

There are stars that orbit each other; in fact, nearly half of all star systems are multiple-star systems. Why is that different from planets orbiting a star?


I may have linked this before;

On the global electrostatic charge of stars
Neslusan, L. (2001)
https://www.aanda...2649.pdf

We can also demonstrate that the electrostatic interaction between two idealized stars charged with the electrostatic charges, derived here, is extremely weak compared to gravity. The magnitude of electrostatic force represents only about 10^−36 of the magnitude of gravity.


Sep 13, 2019
@Castro, gently, slowly. Let the argument develop. We might need that later but we don't yet. Don't jostle my elbow, I'm playin' this hand.

Sep 14, 2019
There are stars that orbit each other; in fact, nearly half of all star systems are multiple-star systems. Why is that different from planets orbiting a star?

Stars don't orbit one another due to gravity, the stars are merely embedded within interacting Birkeland currents. Birkeland currents often interact in pairs, but they can also include three four or more filaments as well.
On the global electrostatic charge of stars
Neslusan, L. (2001)

I could careless what your plasma ignoramuses believe, they are plumbers attempting to describe complex electronics.

Sep 14, 2019
There are stars that orbit each other; in fact, nearly half of all star systems are multiple-star systems. Why is that different from planets orbiting a star?

Stars don't orbit one another due to gravity, the stars are merely embedded within interacting Birkeland currents. Birkeland currents often interact in pairs, but they can also include three four or more filaments as well.
On the global electrostatic charge of stars
Neslusan, L. (2001)

I could careless what your plasma ignoramuses believe, they are plumbers attempting to describe complex electronics.


Hahahaha! And who are these plasma geniuses who describe these orbital parameters due to impossible electric woo? Have they never even written up their woo? Where is the woo? I want woo, and I want it now! Link me to the woo!

Sep 14, 2019
So where are these supposed Birkeland currents at Alpha Centauri? Because we aren't detecting them from here, and we would. And we *do* detect gravity from there. So where's the charges on Alpha Cent A, B, and C? They're just 4.3 light years away. And they orbit each other.

Sep 14, 2019
And BTW, we *do* have Birkeland currents here on Earth, and they don't noticeably affect our orbit. How does that work?

Sep 14, 2019
Not only that but there are much bigger electric currents at Jupiter, between Jupiter and Io. Yet, the Jovian moons have been used for hundreds of years for navigation; they were used in the 1700s by seamen to find their longitude. It was considered the most precise method. The currents don't seem to have affected Io's orbit any. So how does that work?

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