Incident on SpaceX pad could delay its first manned flight

The Crew Dragon capsule seen at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida in a January 29, 2019 photo provided by NASA
The Crew Dragon capsule seen at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida in a January 29, 2019 photo provided by NASA

A mysterious but apparently serious incident occurred Saturday in Cape Canaveral, Florida involving the SpaceX capsule intended to carry American astronauts into space late this year, the private company and NASA announced.

"Earlier today, SpaceX conducted a series of engine tests on a Crew Dragon test vehicle on our test stand at Landing Zone 1 in Cape Canaveral, Florida," a SpaceX spokesman said in a statement. "The initial tests completed successfully but the final test resulted in an anomaly on the ."

A photo on the Florida Today website showed large amounts of smoke pouring out of the test site, and there was speculation about a possible explosion, but neither SpaceX nor NASA would provide any immediate detail.

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine referred on Twitter only to an "anomaly."

"This is why we test," he added. "We will learn, make the necessary adjustments and safely move forward."

Crew Dragon undertook a successful test flight in March, sending an unmanned capsule to dock for five days with the International Space Station before returning to Earth.

NASA called the flight "a major milestone," and it raised hopes that the Crew Dragon's first manned flight could take place before year's end.

The capsule is equipped with eight (named SuperDraco) that can provide an emergency backup system: for example, if the encounters a problem, SuperDraco allows the capsule to quickly detach and return the astronauts safely to Earth.

NASA is counting on SpaceX's capsule, as well as Boeing's Starliner, to ferry astronauts to and from the ISS, a task handled since 2011 by Russia.

SpaceX was founded in 2002 by Elon Musk to help reduce space transportation costs—and with an ultimate goal of helping colonize Mars.


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Citation: Incident on SpaceX pad could delay its first manned flight (2019, April 21) retrieved 17 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-incident-spacex-pad-flight.html
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Apr 21, 2019
An explosion could be caused by a number of things, even a mechanical failure of a part. Hoping that the problem is found and fixed soon.

Apr 22, 2019
Pussytard the immortal troll erupts again
An explosion could be caused by a number of things, even a mechanical failure of a part. Hoping that the problem is found and fixed soon.
Please explain why in your mind you thought it necessary to post a completely worthless comment such as this. Are you really this inane?

Of course you are. You've posted 1000s of similar such floating turds here in the past under a dozen sticks including pirouette, ritchieguy, racistblackguy, obama_socks, pussycat_eyes, russkiye, jewsrule...

Stop trashing this site with embarrassing displays of stupidity.

Apr 22, 2019
like any other toxic social media user, he/she/it's just looking for attention

Apr 22, 2019
Drax, err I mean Musk, and his evil plot was thwarted once again by 007...

Apr 22, 2019
Hmm...the Dragon ate something that disagreed with it.

Apr 22, 2019
An unofficial video show a series of explosions that seem to make confetti of the capsule (and its the charred DM1 tested for reuse), which is consistent with the series of smoke puffs in the more public videos from afar. But as of yet there is little of tangible data.

Apr 23, 2019
An unofficial video show a series of explosions that seem to make confetti of the capsule (and its the charred DM1 tested for reuse), which is consistent with the series of smoke puffs in the more public videos from afar. But as of yet there is little of tangible data.


The Apollo program had 'duplicate' rockets and capsules to work on in the event of a failure of some sort in the actual model. Perhaps SpaceX will find the cause of the explosion if they go through the exact same routine on a duplicate model. Challenger didn't have that luxury.

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