Russia reports computer bug on International Space Station

November 6, 2018
ISS. Credit: NASA

Russia's space agency says that one of the International Space Station's computers has malfunctioned, but the glitch doesn't pose any risks to the crew.

Roscosmos said Tuesday that one of three computers in the station's Russian module has failed. It said Russian flight controllers plan to reboot it Thursday.

The agency emphasized that the computer problem wouldn't affect the station's crew—NASA's Serena Aunon-Chancellor, Russian Sergei Prokopyev and German Alexander Gerst. It said two other computers can maintain the station's operation.

The follows last month's aborted launch of a new station crew. NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin landed safely after their Russian booster rocket failed two minutes into the Oct. 11 flight.

The next crew is set to be launched in early December.

Explore further: Russian rocket puts satellite into orbit, 1st since failure

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